Search Results for “feed” – UI Libraries on the web https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web Tue, 19 Jun 2018 18:39:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6 Web site/page feedback https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/feedback/ Mon, 12 Mar 2018 20:37:23 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/?page_id=1147
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rss test https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/rss-test/ Fri, 25 Aug 2017 19:14:47 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/?page_id=1114 ]]> Thumbnail Image Cropping in WordPress https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blog-posts/thumbnail-cropping/ Mon, 17 Apr 2017 21:17:37 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blogs/image-cropping/ Summary

Sometimes you may wish to focus on a portion of the featured image and not crop it prior to upload. There is a way to do that for thumbnails. See below.

Longer read

WordPress creates different sizes of each uploaded image so that it does need to use the huge 1200×1200 pixel image for the smallest of thumbnails. This would not be a good use of limited bandwidth. Accordingly, the thumbnails that are used in syndicated feeds (e.g., when a post is included on the Libraries home page) are drawn from the smallest image version that WordPress creates.

[more to come]

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Featured image importance https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blog-posts/featured-image-importance/ Mon, 17 Apr 2017 21:17:37 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blogs/featured-image-importance/ Summary

If you wish to have your post appear in feeds in other locations you will need to add a feature image so it has an thumbnail image associated with it.

Longer read

If you look at the home page for our blogs, you will see little, square thumbnail images next to every post teaser. This is how to add/manage those little images.

Example of a blog feed with square image to the left of each post teaser.

Examples of the thumbnails

Taking more control using a “Featured Image”

When you are in the edit page for your post, look in the right sidebar (probably near the bottom) and you will see a “Featured Image” box. Clicking on the “Set featured image” link will display the Media library to chose an existing image or upload an image. If set, a featured image become the image that is used for the blogs feed. It does not show up in the content of your post.

Things to remember about the featured image:

  • It should be square or look good cropped as shown above.
  • It should be at least 150px by 150px (300px by 300px is even better) so that the resolution does not suffer in some contexts.

Square thumbnail and a non-square image

Automation is a wonderful thing if it does what we want. The square thumbnails use the largest possible version of an image that fits by cropping a square out of the center of the image. See the examples below.

Landscape (primarily horizontal) images are cropped to cut away the right and left edges.

Landscape image cropping

Portrait (primarily vertical) images are cropped to cut away the top and bottom edges.

Portrait image cropping

For the above examples the cropping to a square image works out because all the salient image information is still inside the square. Other images will be less than optimal.

Example of a bumper sticker failing to crop well.

A cropping failure

So it behooves you to use an image with better aspect ratio.

Alternative to cropping before you upload your Featured Image

There is now an option to crop the thumbnail with a desired focus (e.g., on a person’s face rather than cropped out of their midsection). See this article on thumbnail cropping in WordPress.

 

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Blog post vs. Event https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blog-posts/blog-post-vs-event/ Mon, 17 Apr 2017 21:12:33 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blogs/blog-post-vs-event/ Summary

Blog posts are for news items. Events should go into the UI’s event site, events.uiowa.edu.

Longer version

There are some key reasons why you should post events to events.uiowa.edu rather than the Libraries’ blog server.

  • By their nature, blog posts are not optimal for advertising events because of differences between the chronological flow of news and event listings. Blog items (news) are posted in reverse chronological order (i.e., new posts at the top that move down over time). Event items are posted in chronological order (i.e., as an event gets closer it climbs to the top of the listing).Therefore, event lists show the next events to occur. Blog post listings may not even have the current events visible because they have rolled offscreen.
  • Placing events on events.uiowa.edu reaches a much greater audience than our blog server.
  • We can use events.uiowa.edu as a single place to put all our events and this cuts down on the number of sources we need to maintain. We can pull event feeds from events.uiowa.edu and put them our Libraries pages.

There are exceptions to every rule. If you have questions about your situation or want help using events.uiowa.edu to advertise your event, contact lib-communication@uiowa.edu or lib-webmaster@uiowa.edu.

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Selecting a thumbnail image for your post’s feed https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blog-posts/selecting-a-thumbnail-image-for-your-posts-feed/ Wed, 08 Feb 2017 14:56:47 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blogs/selecting-a-thumbnail-image-for-your-posts-feed/ Introduction

If you look at the home page for our blogs, you will see little, square thumbnail images next to every post teaser. This is how to add/manage those little images.

Example of a blog feed with square image to the left of each post teaser.

Examples of the thumbnails

What happens by default?

If you do nothing to your blog post the thumbnail will use the first image included in your post, if any exists. If there are no images in your post then it uses a default image for the UI Libraries (or, perhaps, your particular blog).

Square thumbnail and a non-square image

Automation is a wonderful thing if it does what we want. The square thumbnails use the largest possible version of an image that fits by cropping a square out of the center of the image. See the examples below.

Landscape (primarily horizontal) images are cropped to cut away the right and left edges.

Landscape image cropping

Portrait (primarily vertical) images are cropped to cut away the top and bottom edges.

Portrait image cropping

For the above examples the cropping to a square image works out because all the salient image information is still inside the square. Other images will be less than optimal.

Example of a bumper sticker failing to crop well.

A cropping failure

So it behooves you to use an image with better aspect ratio. This is not always simple so…

Taking more control using a “Featured Image”

When you are in the edit page for your post, look in the right sidebar (probably near the bottom) and you will see a “Featured Image” box. Clicking on the “Set featured image” link will display the Media library to chose an existing image or upload an image. If set, a featured image become the image that is used for the blogs feed. It does not show up in the content of your post.

Things to remember about the featured image:

  • It should be square or look good cropped as shown above.
  • It should be at least 200px by 200px so that the resolution does not suffer in some applications of the image.

 

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Blog post taxonomies: Categories, Tags & Syndications https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blog-posts/blog-post-taxonomies-categories-tags-syndications/ Wed, 08 Feb 2017 14:56:47 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/support/blogs/blog-post-taxonomies-categories-tags-syndications/ Introduction

Categories, Tags and Syndications are separate taxonomies that can be applied to a blog post, but each has a slightly different purpose.

Categories

Categories is a thematic taxonomy. It is a curated list answering the question “What is this post about?”

Examples:  “Events”, “Biomedical Research” or “Banned Book Week”

Categories are seen by the public.

Tags

Tags is like Categories, but more arbitrary. It is commonly used for grouping a set of posts together that may not be related by a Category or Syndication. It avoids cluttering the Categories taxonomy list with items that become too precise and numerous.

Tags are possibly seen by the public at the end of a post at the discretion of the blog owners.

Syndications

Syndications is a taxonomy answering the question, “Where is this post to be published?” Instead of automatically appearing on a landing page, a Syndication can be chosen to toggle the post’s visibility on or off. Basically, a feed can be created for any location based upon a Syndication.

Examples:  “UI Libraries home page”, “Sciences Library home page” or “Open Access Week page”

Syndications are not seen by the public.

N.B. Changing any of these taxonomies for a post may take an hour or so to show due to caching.

 

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Blog post taxonomies: Categories, Tags & Syndications https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/blog-post-taxonomies-categories-tags-syndications/ https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/blog-post-taxonomies-categories-tags-syndications/#respond Wed, 26 Oct 2016 18:09:15 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/?p=721 Categories, Tags and Syndications are separate taxonomies that can be applied to a blog post, but each has a slightly different purpose.

Categories

Categories is a thematic taxonomy. It is a curated list answering the question “What is this post about?”

Examples:  “Events”, “Biomedical Research” or “Banned Book Week”

Categories are seen by the public.

Tags

Tags is like Categories, but more arbitrary. It is commonly used for grouping a set of posts together that may not be related by a Category or Syndication. It avoids cluttering the Categories taxonomy list with items that become too precise and numerous.

Tags are possibly seen by the public at the end of a post at the discretion of the blog owners.

Syndications

Syndications is a taxonomy answering the question, “Where is this post to be published?” Instead of automatically appearing on a landing page, a Syndication can be chosen to toggle the post’s visibility on or off. Basically, a feed can be created for any location based upon a Syndication.

Examples:  “UI Libraries home page”, “Sciences Library home page” or “Open Access Week page”

Syndications are not seen by the public.

 

N.B. Changing any of these taxonomies for a post may take an hour or so to show due to caching.

 

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https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/blog-post-taxonomies-categories-tags-syndications/feed/ 0
Selecting a thumbnail image for your post’s feed https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/selecting-an-image-for-your-posts-feed/ https://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/selecting-an-image-for-your-posts-feed/#respond Thu, 05 Nov 2015 17:03:50 +0000 http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/web/?p=411 Introduction

If you look at the home page for our blogs, you will see little, square thumbnail images next to every post teaser. This is how to add/manage those little images.

Example of a blog feed with square image to the left of each post teaser.

Examples of the thumbnails

What happens by default?

If you do nothing to your blog post the thumbnail will use the first image included in your post, if any exists. If there are no images in your post then it uses a default image for the UI Libraries (or, perhaps, your particular blog).

Square thumbnail and a non-square image

Automation is a wonderful thing if it does what we want. The square thumbnails use the largest possible version of an image that fits by cropping a square out of the center of the image. See the examples below.

Landscape (primarily horizontal) images are cropped to cut away the right and left edges.

Landscape image cropping

Portrait (primarily vertical) images are cropped to cut away the top and bottom edges.

Portrait image cropping

For the above examples the cropping to a square image works out because all the salient image information is still inside the square. Other images will be less than optimal.

Example of a bumper sticker failing to crop well.

A cropping failure

So it behooves you to use an image with better aspect ratio. This is not always simple so…

Taking more control using a “Featured Image”

When you are in the edit page for your post, look in the right sidebar (probably near the bottom) and you will see a “Featured Image” box. Clicking on the “Set featured image” link will display the Media library to chose an existing image or upload an image. If set, a featured image become the image that is used for the blogs feed. It does not show up in the content of your post.

Things to remember about the featured image:

  • It should be square or look good cropped as shown above.
  • It should be at least 200px by 200px so that the resolution does not suffer in some applications of the image.

 

 

 

 

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