William Henry Jackson Photographs
"Illustrations of Typical North American Indians"

MsC 539

Collection Dates: 1860's -- 1877
12 oversize boxes,1 oversize page, 2 album visual finding aid, 1 box negatives, 1 album slides

Collection Guide

This document describes a Manuscript Collection held by the

Special Collections Department
University of Iowa Libraries
e-mail: lib-spec@uiowa.edu

 

Blackhawk, Iowa Chief, d. 1871

Guide Contents

Administrative Information

Historical Note

Scope and Contents of the Collection

Related Materials

Acquisition and Processing Information

Box Contents List

Individual Image Descriptions


Administrative Information

Access and Restrictions: None

Digital Surrogates: Except where indicated, this document describes but does not reproduce the actual text, images and objects which make up this collection. Materials are available only in the Special Collections Department.

Copyright:  Please read The University of Iowa Libraries' statement on "Property Rights, Copyright Law, and Permissions to Use Unpublished Materials"

Use of Collections:  The University of Iowa Libraries supports access to the materials, published and unpublished, in its collections. Nonetheless, access to some items may be restricted by their fragile condition or by contractual agreement with donors, and it may not be possible at all times to provide appropriate machinery for reading, viewing or accessing non-paper-based materials. Please read our Use of Manuscripts Statement.


Historical Note

The William Henry Jackson Photographs are a collection of images of Native Americans, dating from the mid 1800's and donated to the University of Iowa in the form of a set of photograph albums entitled "Illustrations of Typical North American Indians." The contents of these albums are reflected in a catalogue entitled Descriptive Catalogue of Photographs of North American Indians. The history of the photographs and catalogue is an interesting story in and of itself, and enhances our understanding of the "standard" images of Native Americans that have appeared as commonplace illustrations in many publications.

The photographs themselves are the work of several photographers, while the catalogue of the photographs is the work of A. Zeno Shindler and William Henry Jackson. It is likely that the original photo albums, donated to the University of Iowa Libraries in the early 1900's, were purchased from one of nine copies of the Jackson Catalogue created by the Bureau of American Ethnology. The Jackson Catalogue is, however, problematic because additions to the images and multiple editors resulted in mistaken identification of illustrations and the loss of many of the photographers' credits.

The early history of the collection and the negatives provide an explanation for the problems inherent in it. The US government, which originally made paintings of visiting Indian delegates, began to photograph delegates when the new technology became readily available. Dr. Ferdinand Hayden of the US Geological Survey and Englishman William Blackmore, an amateur ethnologist, collected the negatives of these photographs and ultimately deposited them at the Smithsonian. A. Zeno Shindler was then contracted to produce a catalogue of 304 original images in 1869, entitled “Photographic Portraits of North American Indians in the Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution,” and the Smithsonian mounted its exhibit of these images the same year. Shindler himself took some of the photographs that were included in this original catalogue, yet credit was not given to every contributing photographer. Copies of the images were widely circulated in major institutions, and they quickly formed the basis of Native American Photography collections in repositories and museums worldwide. As the catalogue circulated, entries were changed, and substitutions were made for original, damaged negatives.

The collection of negatives continued to grow as the US Government sponsored four important surveys of the American west during the 1870's. Photographer William Henry Jackson worked with these surveys, added negatives to the Smithsonian collection, and continued the cataloging work that Shindler had begun. In 1874, Jackson made a preliminary catalogue of over 1,000 images, which included most of the 300 images in the Shindler Catalogue and added other images taken during the surveys. Jackson grouped tribes under linguistic families, rather than alphabetically, and his descriptions included biographies, comments, and details about the subjects' physical stature. He expanded the catalogue in 1877. Not surprisingly, Jackson's work included all mistakes that were originally found in Shindler's catalogue.

The Jackson catalogue was viewed as a significant contribution to the field, and copies were circulated. The Smithsonian Bureau of American Ethnology continued to catalogue photographs, and in the 1980's, the data about the collections were computerized and placed online.

The original images held by the University of Iowa were donated by J. L. Pickard in the early 1900's. Originally in deteriorating scrapbook albums, the photographs required preservation. In the early 1990's, the photographs themselves were photographed, in order to create a visual finding aid for the collection. The originals were then re-mounted on acid free boards, covered with preservation mylar and stored in acid free boxes.


Scope and Contents

This finding aid for the Jackson Photographs held at the University of Iowa was based on William Henry Jackson's 1877 catalog, Descriptive Catalogue of Photographs of North American Indians. This was published by the US Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories as Miscellaneous Publication No. 9. Because of the errors in the original Shindler Catalogue that were carried over into the Jackson Catalogue, the researcher must understand the limitations of this finding aid. Paula Fleming, Senior Archivist at the Smithsonian's National Anthropological Archives, worked for 30 years to restore the accuracy of the original Shindler Catalogue, and in 2003 published Native American Photography at the Smithsonian: The Shindler Catalogue, which compiles much of the missing information about the Shindler images. The book recreates the original Shindler exhibit catalogue from 1869, with added illustrations and information.

To most accurately study the collection, researchers should use Fleming's publication in tandem with Jackson's 1877 catalog and the University of Iowa's finding aids and images.

Researchers should note that numbers in parenthesis following photograph numbers or descriptions are the numbers that are assigned in Jackson's 1877 catalog. There are some photographs included at the end of the collection which do not include these parenthetical numbers, and this implies that they were added to the scrapbook donated to the University of Iowa. The origin of these photographs is unknown.


Related Materials

Visual Finding Aid for the images -- Two volumes containing black and white photographs of all images, identified by volume and page number. Stored with the collection.

Fleming, Paula Richardson. The North American Indians in early photographs. New York : Harper & Row, 1986.
MAIN Oversize FOLIO E77.5 .F54 1986

Fleming, Paula Richardson. Native American Photography at the Smithsonian: The Shindler Catalogue. Washington: Smithsonian Books, 2003.
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS Reference FOLIO E89.S58 2003

Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942. Photographs of Indians selected from the collection in the possession of the U.S. Geological survey of the territories [microform]. Prof. F.V. Hayden in charge. Representing 70 different tribes. 1876. 1 p. l., 616 mount. photos. on 100 l. 41 x 54 cm. Microfilm. New Haven, Conn., Yale University, 1974? 1 reel. 35 mm.
MAIN MEDIA SERVICES Film 21660

Jackson, William Henry. Descriptive catalogue of photographs of North American Indians. Washington, Govt. print. off., 1877.
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS X-COLLECTION E89.J14

Jackson, William Henry. Time exposure; the autobiography of William Henry Jackson.
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS X-COLLECTION TR140.J27 A3 
MAIN LIBRARY TR140.J27 A3 


Acquisition and Processing Information

The prints were presented to the University by J. L. Pickard in the early 1900’s. They were given to J. L. Pickard by Mrs. Governor Kirkwood.

Guide posted to Internet: May, 2005


Box Contents List

Box 1 Volume I, pgs. 1 - 20
Box 2 Volume I, pgs. 21 - 40
Box 3 Volume I, pgs. 41 - 60
Box 4 Volume I, pgs. 61 - 80
Box 5 Volume I, pgs. 81 - 100
Box 6 Volume I, pgs. 101 - 120
Box 7 Volume II, pgs. 1 - 20
Box 8 Volume II, pgs. 21 - 40
Box 9 Volume II, pgs. 41 - 60
Box 10 Volume II, pgs. 61 - 79
Box 11 Volume II, pgs. 80 - 91
Box 12 Volume II, pgs. 92 - 103

Native American Indians Finding Aid (2 volumes)

Photograph Negatives

Slides of pages (1 volume)

Scrapbook Provenance Page (1 oversize)


Individual Images

Linguistic Series titles are indicated with Roman numerals. Tribes within each linguistic series are indicated with Arabic numerals.

Specific images within the Linguistic Series/Tribe are numbered individually: Volume number . Page number . Photo number

 

I. ALGONKINS

1. CHEYENNES

1.1.1 (117)

1.1.2 HAH-KET-HOME-MAH. Little Robe. (Front.) SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (118)

1.1.3 HAH-KET-HOME-MAH. Little Robe. (Front.) SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (120)

1.1.4 HAH-KET-HOME-MAH. Little Robe. (Profile.) SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (119)

1.1.5 HAH-KET-HOME-MAH. Little Robe. (Profile.) SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (121)

1.1.6 HAH-KET-HOME-MAH. Little Robe. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (109)

1.2.1 MIN-NIN-NE-WAH. Whirlwind. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (110)

1.2.2 WHOAK-POO-NO-BATS. White Shield. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (111)

1.2.3 WO-PO-HAM. White Horse. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (112)

1.2.4 BAH-TA-CHE. Medicine Man. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (113)

1.2.5 ED. GUERRIER. Interpreter. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (115)

1.2.6 LAME WHITE MAN. NORTHERN CHEYENNE.
WILD HOG. NORTHERN CHEYENNE. (26)

1.3.1 DULL KNIFE. NORTHERN CHEYENNE.
LITTLE WOLF. NORTHERN CHEYENNE. (28)

1.3.2 CRAZY HEAD. NORTHERN CHEYENNE.
SPOTTED WOLF. NORTHERN CHEYENNE. (29)

1.3.3 STONE CALF and WIFE. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (30)

1.3.4 STONE CALF and WIFE. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (31)

1.3.5 WHIRLWIND and PAWNEE. SOUTHERN CHEYENNE. (116)

1.3.6 HIGH TOE. (122)

1.4.1 GROUPS AT AGENCY. (123)

1.4.2 GROUPS AT AGENCY. (124)

1.4.3 WAU. CHEYENNE.

1.4.4 WAU. CHEYENNE.

1.4.5 MOHINUKMAHAIT. CHEYENNE.

1.4.6 MOHINUKMAHAIT. CHEYENNE.

2. CHIPPPEWAS

1.5.1 ES-EN-CE. Little Shell. PEMBINA. (1001)
Head chief of the Pembinas, residing at Turtle Mountain, in Dakota. His father and grandfather were chiefs of the same band before him. Took an active part against the Sioux in the Minnesota massacres in 1863. Visited Washington in 1874, at the head of a delegation in behalf of their bands, to protest against being removed from their old homes about Turtle Mountain.

1.5.2. MIS-TO-YA-BE. Little Bull. PEMBINA. (1002)
Head brave of the Pembinas, and resides at Pembina. Is a man of considerable influence, his word being law with his band. Has good common sense and fine executive ability. Was removed by the Government to White Earth reservation, but refuses to live there, and has gone back to his old home. Has fought the Sioux frequently, and has been quite successful in stealing horses from them. Has two wives. Does no farming.

1.5.3 KA-EES-PA. Something Blown Up by the Wind. PEMBINA. (1003)
A half-breed, but lives and dresses like an Indian. His father was made a chief of the Pembinas by the English and Americans, and upon his death succeeded him. Is a very successful hunter, and is looked upon as a representative man of the tribe.

1.5.4 KE-WOE-SAIS-WE-RO. The Man Who Knows How to Hunt. PEMBINA. (1004)
A half-breed and third brave of the band. Always joined the Chippewas in fighting the Sioux--the Pembinas fighting on horseback--and counts four scalps. Is a trader. Is thought very much of by his tribe, and has a reputation for moral worth and straight-forward dealing.

1.5.5 SHAY-WI-ZICK. Sour Spittle. RED LAKE. (1068)
A brave of the Red Lake band of Chippewas and younger brother of the head chief. His wife and children were killed by the Sioux, and he fought them frequently in return, killing two. Was a good speaker and farmed a good deal. Died last winter, aged about 70.

1.5.6 QUI-WI-ZHEN-SHISH. Bad Boy. RED LAKE. (80)

1.6.1 QUI-WI-ZHEN-SHISH. Bad Boy. RED LAKE. (1069)
Foremost brave of the Red Lake band. His father was chief, which office is now held by his older brother. Was ranked as one of the bravest of the Chippewas in their battles with the Sioux, and took many scalps. Was a fine speaker and a man of much influence. Farmed very successfully and raised considerable corn, and was also a good hunter. Had two wives. Died in 1872.

1.6.2 QUI-WI-ZENS. The Boy. RED LAKE. (1070)
A brave and a leading warrior in the battles of his tribe with the Sioux. A good speaker, hunter, and farmer, although the farming is done almost entirely by his wife and children, as is teh case with all these Indians. Is now dead.

1.6.3 AUGUSTE. PEMBINA. (1071)
A brave of the Pembinas, formerly residing near the British line, but now removed, with his band, to the White Earth reservation. Has the reputation of being a miserable, worthless Indian, unwilling to work, and adhering with great tenacity to the heathenish customs of his tribe. Was baptized in his infancy by the Roman Catholics, but has renounced his Christianity. Has had his skull broken three times (more text but cut-off)

1.6.4 MOOZOMO. Moose's Dung. RED LAKE. (1072)
A petty chief of the Red Lake band. Died some years ago at a very old age. Was a great hunter, and farmed considerably also. Was much respected by the Red Lake bands, and especially so by the whites.

1.6.5 ME-JAW-KEY-OSH. Something in the Air Gradually Falling to the Earth. RED LAKE. (1073)
A brave but recently made a chief of the Red Lake Chippewas, and is ranked as the very bravest of all his tribe. Had always been accustomed to fight the Sioux, but after the massacre of 1862-'63 reorganized and led a small party of from six to ten of his bravest men against them every summer for some time, killing with his own hand fifteen of their enemies and bringing home their scalps. Was a crafty warrior and knew well how to slay his foe without losing his own life. He still lives, farming and hunting for a living, and is a man of great influence in his band.

1.6.6 ESSINIWUB OBWISSUN. The Son of Essiniwub. RED LAKE. (1074)
A quiet, peaceable young man, never on the warpath, peace having been declared with the Sioux before he came of age.

1.7.1 MAIADJIAUSH. Something Beginning to Sail Off. RED LAKE. (1075)
A brave residing at Red Lake. His father was a chief and his younger brother the present head chief of the Red Lake band. Ten years ago had the reputation of being a bad man, and has the same suspicion still hanging about him; is ill-natured, cross-grained, and always striking and quarrelling with his fellow-Indians.

1.7.2 TIBISHKO-BINESS. Like a Bird. RED LAKE. (1077)
A petty chief and brother of Bad Boy. Has often fought the Sioux as a leading brave. Hunts for a living, while his family cultivate corn and potatoes. Is a good speaker and much respected by the Red Lake.

1.7.3 PO-GO-NAY-GE-SHICK. Hole in the Day. (78)

1.7.4 PO-GO-NAY-GE-SHICK. Hole in the Day. (79)

1.7.5 AH-AH-SHAW-WE-KE-SHICK. Crossing Sky. RABBIT LAKE. (81)

1.7.6 NAH-GUN-A-GOW-BOW. Standing Forward. RABBIT LAKE. (82)

1.8.1 KISH-KA-NA-CUT. Stump. MILLE LAC. (83)

1.8.2 MIS-KO-PE-NEN-SHA. Red Bird. LAKE WIINIPEG. (84)

1.8.3 NAW-YAW-NAB. The Foremost Sitter. WISCONSIN. (85)

1.8.4. NOW-WE-GE-SHICK. Noon Day. (86)

1.8.5 NILOGILIG. OLIBWA.

1.8.6 NILOGILIG. OLIBWA.

1.9.1 KISKITAWAG. OLIBWA.

1.9.2 KISKITAWAG. OLIBWA.

1.9.3 EDAWIGILIG. OLIBWA.

1.9.4 EDAWIGILIG. OLIBWA.

3. DELAWARES

1.9.5 BLACK BEAVER. (181)

1.9.6 BLACK BEAVER. (182)
Is a full-blood Delaware. Has traveled very extensively through the mountains, serving at one time as a captain in the United States Army. Has a large farm under cultivation, and lives in a very comfortable manner, having good, substantial frontier buildings. He commenced life as a wild Indian trapper, until, becoming familiar with almost all of the unexplored region of the West, and being a remarkably truthful and reliable man, he was much sought after as a guide, and accompanied several expeditions in that capacity. His life has been one of bold adventure, fraught with many interesting incidents, which, if properly written out, would form an interesting and entertaining volume.--Batty.

1.10.1. GREAT BEAR. (186)

1.10.2 MOSES LADD. (852)
An intelligent and influential man in the tribe, a grandson of Corrow and nephew of Shu-na-ma-shu-na-ne, noted chiefs of the Menomonees. In 1876 Mr. Ladd was sent as a delegate from his tribe to Washington to settle various complications before the Departments and Congress. Was born at Green Bay, Wis., in 1828. Is of mixed blood.

4. MENOMONEES (no photographs)


5. MIAMIES

1.10.3 LUM-KI-KOM. (419)

1.10.4 THOS. MILLER. (420)

1.10.5 JOE DICK. (421)

1.10.6 ROUBIDEAUX. (422)

1.11.1 THOS. RICHARDWELL. (425)

6. OTTAWAS

1.11.2 SUCKER. (504)

1.11.3 CHE-PO-QUA. Lightning. (505)
English name, Henry Clay. Full-blood Ottawa. Uneducated, but of considerable executive ability. Is a councilman and an energetic, unselfish worker for the advancement of the tribe. Was born in 1830, and this photograph taken in 1868.

1.11.4 PARTEE. John Wilson. (506)
Chief of the tribe from 1867 to 1869, dying before the expiration of his term of office, aged about 60 years. Was but little versed in English, but was well educated in his own language. Was noted for amiability and hospitality, and made one of the very best of chiefs.

1.11.5 SHA-PON-DA. Passing Through. (James Wind.) (507)
Succeeded John Wilson as chief for two years. Is a half blood. Is well educated in native language, and an ordained minister in the Baptist church. Died in 1875.

1.11.6 JOSEPH KING. (1040)
Successor of James Wind as chief of the Ottawas. Is well educated in both native and English languages. Age, 50 years.

1.12.1 L. S. DAGNET. (1041)
Born as a Peoria, but was expelled from the tribe, and the Ottawas adopted him as one of their own.

1.12.2 FRANK KING. (1039)
Also an adopted member of the tribe, being originally a Chippewa. Has been a counsellor, and also judge of the council.

7. POTTAWATOMIES

1.12.3 MZHIK-KI-AN. Thunder Coming Down to the Ground. (522)

8. SACS AND FOXES

1.12.4 ST. MARY'S MISSION, KANSAS. (839)

1.12.5 ST. MARY'S MISSION, KANSAS. (840)

1.12.6 (678?)

1.13.1 KEOKUK, JR.
Son of the preceding, and succeeded him in the chieftainship. (678)

1.13.2 KEOKUK, JR. (681)

1.13.3 KEOKUK, JR. (682)

1.13.4 KEOKUK, JR. (705)

1.13.5 CHARLES KEOKUK.
Grandson of Keokuk, Sr. (679)

1.13.6 CHARLES KEOKUK. (684)

1.14.1 KEOKUK, JR., and CHARLES KEOKUK. (683)

1.14.2 MO-LESS. (685)

1.14.3 MO-LESS. (686)

1.14.4 SAC-A-PE. (687)

1.14.5 SAC-A-PE. (688)

1.14.6 MO-LESS and SAC-A-PE. (689)

1.15.1 THE SEA. (693)

1.15.2 BIG BEAR. (694)

1.15.3 MO-KO-HO-KO. (696)

1.15.4 MO-KO-HO-KO. (697)

1.15.5 MO-KO-HO-KO. (698)

1.15.6 MANO-TO-WA. (700)

1.16.1 WAH-COM-MO. (400)

1.16.2 NE-QUAW-HO-KO. Grey Eyes. (401)

1.16.3 WAH-PAH-NAH-KA-NA-KAH. Bear Eating Acorns Up a Tree, or Goo. Gomez. (701)

1.16.4 WAH-PAH-NAH-KA-NA-KAH. Bear Eating Acorns Up a Tree, or Geo. Gomez. (396)

1.16.5 WAH-PAH-NAH-KA-NA-KAH. Bear Eating Acorns Up a Tree, or Geo. Gomez. (691)
A Mexican by birth, and interpreter for the Sacs and Foxes since 1858. Was sold to the Comanches when thirteen years of age, but ran away and joined the Kickapoos. Was captured again by the Comanches while he was out with the Kickapoos hunting, but was allowed to escape and rejoin his Indian friends. Drove Government teams for a while between Forts Leavenworth and Kearney. In 1852 joined the Sacs and Foxes, and participated in some of their battles on the plains.
He has been married into the following tribes: Caddoes, Kickapoos, Pawnees, Seminoles, Shawnees, Pottawatomies, Winnebagoes, Iowas, and Sacs and Foxes of Missouri; and speaks the languages of the Creeks, Caddo, Comanche, Pottawatomie, Kickapoo, Sac and Fox, Pawnee, Iowa, and Winnebago, besides English and Spanish.

1.16.6 COMMISSIONER BOGY READING TREATY. (806)

1.17.1 COMMISSIONER AND DELEGATION OF CHIEFS. (710)

1.17.2 GROUPS OF DELEGATIONS. (706)

1.17.3 GROUPS OF DELEGATIONS. (707)

9. SHAWNEE

1.17.4 WA-WA-SI-SI-MO. (711)
1.17.5 F.A. ROGERS. (712)
1.17.6 CHARLES TUCKER. (713)
1.18.1 KALUI. (Front.) SHAWNEE.
1.18.2 KALUI. (Profile.) SHAWNEE.
1.18.3 WETTAKA. (Front.) SHAWNEE.
1.18.4 WETTAKA. (Profile.) SHAWNEE.

10. PEQUOD

1.18.5 WAUN-NAUN-CON. J.C.W. Adams. STOCKBRIDGE. (1049)
Born on the Seneca reservation in New York in 1843, and removed to Wisconsin in 1853. Received a collegiate education at the Lawrence Univerity. In 1876 represented the Stockbridges and Munsees as a delegate in Washington.

1.18.6 LYMAN P. FOWLER. BROTHERTON. (1065)
A member of the Brotherton branch of the Pequod Nation. Born in Oneida County, New York, in 1823, but emigrated with some of the Stockbridges to Wisconsin in 1836. Chosen as a delegate to Washington on behalf of the Stockbridges and Munsees.

II. ATHABASCAS

1. APACHES

1.19.1 ESKIMINZIN. PINAL. (853)
Height, 5 feet 8 inches; circumference of head, 22 1/4 inches; circumference of chest, 37 inches; age, 38 years. Head chief of San Carlos reservation and of the Pinal Apaches. His family was among those slain at the Camp Grant massacre in 1871. Is now taking the lead in living a civilized life, having taken up a farm on the San Carlos River.

1.19.2 ESKIMINZIN AND WIFE. PINAL. (854)

1.19.3 CASSADORA. A hunter. PINAL. (855)
Height, 5 feet 8 1/2 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest, 40 inches. Petty chief; was one of the most lawless and intractable of the tribe. Took part in the assault on a wagon-train in the Canon Dolores in 1872.

1.19.4 CASSADORA AND WIFE. PINAL. (856)

1.19.5 ESKINILAY. PINAL. (857)
Height, 5 feet 2 inches; circumference of head, 22 inches; circumference of chest, 35 inches. A captain of the reservation police.

1.19.6 ESKINILAY AND WIFE. PINAL. (858)

1.20.1 WIFE OF ESKINILAY. PINAL. (858 1/2)

1.20.2 CHIQUITO. PINAL. (860)
Height, 5 feet 3/4 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest, 36 inches. A petty chief.

1.20.3 CHIQUITO AND WIFE. PINAL. (861)

1.20.4 SAYGULLY. PINAL. (862)
Height, 5 feet 7 1/4 inches; circumference of head, 22 1/4 inches; circumference of chest, 36 inches.

1.20.5 ESKAYELAH. COYOTERO. (863)
Height, 5 feet 11 iches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest, 36 1/2 inches. A hereditary head chief of the Coyotero Apaches.

1.20.6 ? COYOTERO. (864)
Height, 5 feet 8 1/2 inches; circumference of head, 22 1/2 inches; circumference of chest, 36 1/2 inches. Is looked upon as being a hard case, and has the reputation of being a great horse-stealer.

1.21.1 CULLAH. CHIRICAHUA. (865)
Height, 5 feet 6 1/4 inches; circumference of head, 22 inches; circumference of chest, 35 1/2 inches.

1.21.2 HAUTUSHNEHAY. FINAL. (866)
Height, 5 feet 9 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest, 36 1/2 inches. One of the reservation policemen appointed by the agent.

1.21.3 NAPASGINGUSH. FINAL. (867)
Height, 5 feet 6 1/2 inches; circumference of head, 21 2/1 inches; circumference of chest, 34 1/2 inches.

1.21.4 CUSHSHASHADO. FINAL. (868)
Height, 5 fet 3 1/4 inches; circumference of head, 22 inches; circumference of chest, 33 inches. A clerk in the trader's store on the San Carlos reservation; speaks English fluently.

1.21.5 FINAL. COYOTERO. (869)
Height, 5 feet 3 1/4 inches; circumference of head 21 3/4 inches; circumference of chest, 37 inches. A sub-chief.

1.21.6 PASSALAH. FINAL. (870)
Height, 5 feet 11 1/2 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest, 37 1/2 inches. A reservation policeman.

1.22.1 MARIJILDO GRIJALVA. (871)
Interpreter. A native of Sonora, Mexico. Was captured when quite young by the Coyotero Apaches, and held by them in captivity until looked upon as one of the tribe.

1.22.2 (871 1/2)

1.22.3 ESKEL-TA-SALA. (Front.) COYOTERO. (1)

1.22.4 ESKEL-TA-SALA. (Side.) COYOTERO. (2)

1.22.5 SANTO. (Front.) COYOTERO. (3)

1.22.6 SANTO. (Side.) COYOTERO. (4)


1.23.1 TA-HO. Equestrian. (Front.) ESSA-QUETA. (5)

1.23.2 TA-HO. Equestrian. (Side.) ESSA-QUETA. (6)
A sub-chief of his band. Age, about 50 years; height, 5 feet, 11 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; chest, 45 inches.

1.23.3 GRAY EAGLE. (Front.) ESSA-QUETA. (7)

1.23.4 GRAY EAGLE. (Side.) ESSA-QUETA. (8)

1.23.5 CAPITAN. (Front.) ESSA-QUETA. (9)

1.23.6 CAPITAN. (Side.) ESSA-QUETA. (10)
Age, about 56 years; height, 5 feet 8 inches; circumference of head, 24 inches; chest, 37 inches.

1.24.1 PACER. (Front.) ESSA-QUETA. (11)

1.24.2 PACER. (Side.) ESSA-QUETA. (12)
Was the acknowledged leader of the Apaches in Indian Territory, and at the same time friendly to the whites. He and his squaw are now both dead.

1.24.3 PACER'S SQUAW. (Front.) ESSA-QUETA. (13)

1.24.4 PACER'S SQUAW. (Side.) ESSA-QUETA. (14)

1.24.5 KLE-ZHEH. JICARILLA. (451)

1.24.6 GUACHINITO. One who Dresses in Indian Clothes. JICARILLA. (449)

1.25.1 GUERITO. The Man with Yellow Hair. JICARILLA. (753)

1.25.2 GUERITO. The Man with Yellow Hair. JICARILLA. (442)
A young chief of the Jicarilla Apaches, and a son of old Guero, their principal chief. This tribe is intermarried with the Utes, and has always been on friendly terms with them. Youn Guerito was sent to Washington in 1873, joining the Ute delegation, for the purpose of effecting some treaty whereby these Apaches might have set apart for them a piece of land of their own to cultivate, as now they roam on Ute land and have no home they can call their own. He is a relative of Ouray, the great chief of the Utes, and through the latter's influence some such arrangement was effected. Guerito is a quiet and peacable young man, a repsentative of his tribe, who prefer farming, and shrink frm all wars against either Indians or white men.

1.25.3 SON OF GUERITO. JICARILLA. (444)

1.25.4 YOUNG BRAVES. JICARILLA. (443)

1.25.5 YOUNG BRAVES. JICARILLA. (445)

1.25.6 YOUNG BRAVES. JICARILLA. (446)

1.26.1 A YOUNG BRAVE. APACHE. (448)

1.26.2 A YOUNG BRAVE. (450)

1.26.3 PAH-YEH, or Hosea Martin. JICARILLA. (447)

1.26.4 SON OF VICENTI. JICARILLA. (18)

1.26.5 PEDRO SCRADILICTO. (Front.) COYOTERO. (125)

1.26.6 PEDRO SCRADILICTO. (Side.) COYOTERO. (126)

1.27.1 ES-CHA-PA. The One-eyed. (Side.) COYOTERO. (652)

1.27.2 ES-CHA-PA. The One-eyed. (Front.) COYOTERO. (127)

1.27.3 JOSE POCATI. (Front.) YUMA. (414)

1.27.4 JOSE POCATI. (Side.) YUMA. (415)

1.27.5 CHARLIE ARRIWAWA. (Front.) MOHAVE. (749)

1.27.6 CHARLIE ARRIWAWA. (Side.) MOHAVE. (750)

1.28.1 (871)

1.28.2 GROUPS comprising all the above included within the Nos. 853-871. (872)

1.28.3 AUGUSTIN VIJIL. (Front.) JICARILLA APACHE.

1.28.4 AUGUSTIN VIJIL. (Profile.) JICARILLA APACHE.

1.28.5 SANTIAGO LARGO. (Front.) JICARILLA APACHE.

1.28.6 SANTIAGO LARGO. (Profile.) JICARILLA APACHE.

1.29.1 NAKANANITEIN. (Front.) APACHE.

1.29.2 NAKANANITEIN. (Profile.) APACHE.

2. NAVAJOS

1.29.3 MANULITO. (1027)
The great war-chief of the Navajos. Has been engaged in many combats, and his breast shows the scars of a number of wounds received in battle; was in command of the Indians during their siege of Fort Defiance.

1.29.4. JUANITA.
The favorite one of the five wives of Manulito, the chief. (1028)

1.29.5 MANULITO SEGUNDO.
Son of Manulito and Juanita. (1029)

1.29.6 CAYATANITA.
A brother of Manulito's, and captain of a band of warriors. (1030)

1.30.1 BARBAS HUERO. Light Beard.
Chief councillor of the tribe, and an earnest advocate of a netted peace policy. (1031)

1.30.2 CABRA NEGRA.
A captain, and a sub chief. (1032)
1.30.3 NARBONA PRIMERO.
A sub-chief, noted as being as consistent total abstinence advocate, and who exerts himself to save his tribe from the curse of intemperance. (1033)

1.30.4 CARNERO MUCHO. A captain of a band. (1034)

1.30.5 GRANADA MUCHO. A captain of a band.
TIENE-SU-SE. Third war-chief.
MARIANA. Second war-chief. (1035)

1.30.6 JUANITA AND GOV. ARNY. Showing Navajo blanket and weaving implements. (1038)

1.31.1 11035 1/2)

1.31.2 BARBANCITO. Little Beard. (786)

1.31.3 MISCELLANEOUS MEN AND BOYS. (452)

1.31.4 MISCELLANEOUS MEN AND BOYS. (453)

1.31.5 MISCELLANEOUS MEN AND BOYS. (454)

1.31.6 MISCELLANEOUS MEN AND BOYS. (455)

III. DAKOTAS

1. CROWS

1.32.1 KAM-NE-BUT-SE. Blackfoot and squaw. (940)

1.32.2 KAM-NE-BUT-SE. Blackfoot. (946)
The principal chief of the Mountain Crows; a splendid specimen of manhood, standing 6 feet 2 inches in height and of very heavy frame; owes his position to his bravery and success in fighting the Sioux, their inveterate enemies. He also ranks high as an orator and councillor in the nation. The first picture, in which he is represented in an elaborate dress of buckskin, was made while on a visit, with a delegation of his tribe, to Washington, in 1873; the other represents him as he appears at his home on the Yellowstone, or in his natural every-day garb.

1.32.3 CHE-VE-TE-PU-MA-TA. Iron Bull and squaw.
One of the principal chiefs of the Mountain Crows. (941)

1.32.4 SE-TA-PIT-SE. Bear Wolf and squaw.

1.32.5 PERITS-HAR-STS. Old Crow and squaw.

1.32.6 KAM-NE-BUT-SE. Blackfoot.
ECHE-HAS-KA. Long Horse.
TE-SHU-NZT. White Calf. (944)

1.33.1 MO-MUKH-PI-TCHE.
ELLA-CAUSS-SE. Thin Belly.
PISH-KI-HA-DI-RI-KY-ISH. The One that Leads the Old Dog. (945)

1.33.2 IN-TEE-US. He Shows His Face. (947)

1.33.3 MIT-CHOO-ASH. Old Onion. (948)

1.33.4 GROUP OF CHIEFS AND HEADMEN. (949)

1.33.5 GROUP OF SQUAWS.
The last four pictures were made at the old agency of the Crows, on the Yellowstone, near Shields River, in 1871. The following were also made at the same place and time, and represent the old mission buildings (lately destroyed by fire), in which the agent had his headquarters; their tents and manner of living, and their mode of burial. (950)

1.33.6 THE MISSION, or agency buildings. (953)

1.34.1 INSIDE VIEW OF A SKIN LODGE. (951)

1.34.2 MODE OF BURIAL. (954)

1.34.3 MIERISHASH. (Front.) ABSAROKA.

1.34.4 MIERISHASH. (Profile.) ABSAROKA.

1.34.5 TSHIDIAPAS. (Front.) ABSAROKA.

1.34.6. TSHIDIAPAS. (Profile.) ABSAROKA.

1.35.1 PERITSHIUSKPA. (Front.) ABSAROKA.

1.35.2 PERITSHIUSKPA. (Profile.) ABSAROKA.

1.35.3 DEEKITSHIS. (Front.) ABSAROKA.

1.35.4 DEEKITSHIS. (Profile.) ABSAROKA.

2. DAKOTAS OR SIOUX

1.35.5 PE-JI'. Grass. (Front.) BLACKFEET. (252)

1.35.6 PE-JI'. Grass. (Profile.) BLACKFEET. (253)

1.36.1 PE-JI'. Grass. (Full-length.) BLACKFEET. (254)

1.36.2 KAN-GI'-I-YO'-TAN-KA. Sitting Crow. (Front.) BLACKFEET. (255)

1.36.3 KAN-GI'-I-YO'-TAN-KA. Sitting Crow. (Profile.) BLACKFEET. (256)

1.36.4 MA'-YA WA-NA-PE-YA. Iron Scare. (Front.) BLACKFEET. (257)

1.36.5 MA'-YA-WA-NA-PE-YA. Iron Scare. (Profile.) BLACKFEET. (258)

1.36.6 WI'-YA-KA-SHA. Red Plume. (Copy.) BLACKFEET. (259)

1.37.1 MA-GA'-SHA-PA. Goose. (Copy.) BLACKFEET.
With the exception of the last two numbers the above represent a portion of the delegation of prominent Sioux chiefs and warriors who visited Washington in 1872. The portraits were made in Washington, and represent them in their best attire. (920)

1.37.2 PEZHI'. (Front.) BLACKFOOT DAKOTA.

1.37.3 PEZHI'. (Profile.) BLACKFOOT DAKOTA.

1.37.4 CIN-TE-GI-LE-SKA. Spotted Tail. (Profile.) BRULE. (337) (SEE TEXT)

1.37.5 SPOTTED TAIL AND SQUAW. BRULE. (338)

1.37.6 SQUAW OF SPOTTED TAIL. (Front.) BRULE. (339)

1.38.1 SQUAW OF SPOTTED TAIL. (Profile.) BRULE. (340)

1.38.2 I-API-OTAH. Gassy. (Front.) BRULE. (341)

1.38.3 I-API-OTAH. Gassy. (Profile.) BRULE. (342)

1.38.4 I-TE'-SAN-YAN. Whitewash his Face. (Front.) BRULE. (343)

1.38.5 I-TE'-SAN-YAN. Whitewash his Face. (Profile.) BRULE. (344)

1.38.6 CHE-TAN'-TA-KPI'. Charge on the Hawk. (Front.) BRULE. (345)

1.39.1 CHE-TAN'-TA-KPI'. Charge on the Hawk. (Profile.) BRULE. (346)

1.39.2 NOM-PA-AP'A. Two Strikes. (Front.) BRULE. (347)

1.39.3 NOM-PA-AP'A. Two Strikes. (Profile.) BRULE. (348)

1.39.4 SQUAW OF TWO STRIKES. (Front.) BRULE. (349)

1.39.5 SQUAW OF TWO STRIKES. (Profile.) BRULE. (350)

1.39.6 KAN-GI'-SHA'-PA. Black Crow. (Front.) BRULE. (351)

1.40.1 KAN-GI'-SHA'-PA. Black Crow. (Profile.) BRULE. (352)

1.40.2 HE-GMA-WA-KU-WA. One who Runs the Tiger. (Front.) BRULE. (353)

1.40.3 HE-GMA-QA-KU-WA. One who Runs the Tiger. (Profile.) BRULE. (354)

1.40.4 WANMBLE'-SHDA. Bald Eagle. (Front.) BRULE. (355)

1.40.5 WANMBLE'-SHDA. Bald Eagle. (Profile.) BRULE. (356)

1.40.6 CHE-CHA'-LU. Thigh. (Front.) BRULE. (357)

1.41.1 CHE-CHA'-LU. Thigh. (Profile.) BRULE> (358)

1.41.2 SQUAW OF THIGH. (Front.) BRULE. (359)

1.41.3 SQUAW OF THIGH. (Profile.) BRULE. (360)

1.41.4 TA-TAN'-KA-SHA'-PA. Black Bull. (Front.) BRULE. (361)

1.41.5 TA-TAN'-KA-SHA'-PA. Black Bull. (Profile.) BRULE. (362)

1.41.6 CHO-NI'-CHA-WA-NI'-CHA. No Flesh. (Profile.) BRULE. (364)

1.42.1 MA'-ZA-PON-KIS'-KA. Iron Shell. (Front.) BRULE. (365)

1.42.2 MA'-ZA-PON-KIS'-KA. Iron Shell. (Profile.) BRULE. (366)

1.42.3 MA-TO'-SHI'-CHA. Wicked Bear. (Front.) BRULE. 1368)

1.42.4 MA-TO'-SHI'-CHA. Wicked Bear. (Full-length.) BRULE. (369)

1.42.5 PA'-HUI-ZI-ZI. Yellow Hairs. (Front.) BRULE. (370)

1.42.6 PA'-HUI-ZI-ZI. Yellow Hairs. (Profile.) BRULE. (371)

1.43.1 I-SHTA'-SKA. White Eyes. (Front.) BRULE. (372)

1.43.2 I-SHTA'-SKA. White Eyes. (Profile.) BRULE. (373)

1.43.3 MA-TO'-DUSA. Swift Bear. (Front.) BRULE. (374)

1.43.4 MA-TO'-DUSA. Swift Bear. (Profile.) BRULE> (375)

1.43.5 WA-KIN'-YAN-SKA. White Thunder. (Front.) BRULE. (376)

1.43.6 WA-KIN'-YAN-SKA. White Thunder. (Profile.) BRULE. (377)

1.44.1 MA'-ZU-O-YA'-TE. Iron Nation. (Front.) BRULE. (378)

1.44.2 MA'-ZU-O-YA'-TE. Iron Nation. (Profile.) BRULE. (379)

1.44.3 MA'-ZU-O-YA'-TE. Iron Nation. (Full-length.) BRULE. (380)
All of the above, under the famous chief Spotted Tail, were members of a delegation sho visited Washington in 1872, and were photographed while there.

1.44.4 MA-TO'-WA-KAN'. Medicine Bear. (Front.) CUT HEAD. (282)

1.44.5 MA-TO'-WA-KAN'. Medicine Bear. (Profile.) CUT HEAD. (283)

1.44.6 MA-TO'-KO-KI'-PA. Afraid of the Bear. (Profile.) CUT HEAD. (285)

1.45.1 MA-TO'-KO-KI'-PA. Afraid of the Bear. (Front.) CUT HEAD (284)

1.45.2 MA-TO'-PO'-ZHE. Bear's Nose. (Front.) CUT HEAD. (286)

1.45.3 MA-TO'-PO'-ZHE. Bear's Nose. (Profile.) CUT HEAD. (287)

1.45.4 CHAN-TE'-HA. Skin of the Heart. (Front.) CUT HEAD. (288)

1.45.5 CHAN-TE'-HA. Skin of the Heart. (Profile.) CUT HEAD. (289)

1.45.6 PI'-PI-SHA. Red Lodge. (Front.) CUT HEAD> (290)

1.46.1 PI'-PI-SHA. Red Lodge. (Profile.) CUT HEAD. (291)

1.46.2 WI-CHA-WANMBLE'. Man who packs the Eagle. (Front.) CUT HEAD. (292)

1.46.3 WI-CHA-WANMBLE'. Man who packs the Eagle. (Profile.) CUT HEAD. (293)

1.46.4 SQUAW OF THE MAN WHO PACKS THE EAGLE. (Front.) CUT HEAD. (294)

1.46.5 SQUAW OF THE MAN WHO PACKS THE EAGLE. (Profile.) CUT HEAD. (295)

1.46.6 SHA-KPE. Six. MDEWAKANTON. (200)
The massacre spoken of in connection with No. 197 was inaugurated by Sha-kpe and his band; some of his young men killed some white men while intoxicated, and then, through fear of retaliation, resolved upon an uprising and the extermination of all the whites at the agency. Sha-kpe's band was re-enforced by the principal warriors from the Mdewakanton and Wahpeton bands, Little Crow taking the leadership. Before they were subdued, 644 men, women and children were massacred, and 93 soldiers killed in battle.

1.47.1 MA-HPI'-YA-LU'-TA. Red Cloud. (Front.) OGALALLA. (296)

1.47.2 MA-HPI'-YA-LU'-TA. Red Cloud. (Profile.) OGALALLA (297) (See text)

1.47.3 RED CLOUD AND MR. BLACKMORE. OGALALLA. (298)

1.47.4 SKUN'-KA-LU'-TA. Red Dog. (Front.) OGALALLA. (299)

1.47.5 SKUN'-KA-LU'-TA. Red Dog. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (300)

1.47.6 SHUN-TO'-KE-CHA-ISH-NA-NA. Lone Wolf. (Front.) OGALALLA. (301)

1.48.1 SHUN-TO'-KE-CHA-ISH-NA-NA. Lone Wolf. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (302)

1.48.2 WA-HU'-WA-PA. Ear of Corn. (Squaw of Lone Wolf. Front.) OGALALLA. (303)

1.48.3 WA-HU'-WA-PA. Ear of Corn. (Squaw of Lone Wolf. Profile.) OGALALLA.
(really 304, although picture is numbered 303)

1.48.4 SI-HA'-TAN'-KA. Big Foot. (Front.) OGALALLA. (305)

1.48.5 SI-HA'-TAN'-KA. Big Foot. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (306)

1.48.6 CHE'-TAN-SKA. White Hawk. (Front.) OGALALLA. (307)

1.49.1 CHE'-TAN-SKA. White Hawk. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (308)

1.49.2 WANMB'LE-KO-KI'-PA. Afraid of the Eagle. (Front.) OGALALLA. (309)

1.49.3 WANMB'LE-KO-KI'-PA. Afraid of the Eagle. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (310)

1.49.4 SHUN'-KA-WA-KAN-TO. Blue Horse. (Front.) OGALALLA. (311)

1.49.5 SHUN'-KA-WA-WAN-TO. BLue Horse. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (312)

1.49.6 WA-CHA-PA. Stabber. (Front.) OGALALLA. (313)

1.50.1 WA-CHA-PA. Stabber. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (314)

1.50.2 I-TE'-SHA'-PA. Dirty Face. (Front.) OGALALLA. (315)

1.50.3 I-TE'-SHA'-PA. Dirty Face. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (316)

1.50.4 TA-TAN'-KA-WAS-TE'. Good Buffalo. (Front.) OGALALLA. (317)

1.50.5 TA-TAN'-KA-WAS-TE'. Good Buffalo. (Profile.) OGALALLA. (318)

1.50.6 HE-HA'-KA-TA'-MA-KA. Poor Elk. (Front.) OGALALLA. (319)

1.53.1. CHU-TU'-HU-TAN'-KA. Big Rib. (Copy.) OGALALLA. (332)

1.53.2 WANMBLE'-KI-CHI-ZU-PI. War Eagle. (Copy.) OGALALLA. (333)

1.53.3 TA-SHUN'-KA-KO-KI-PA. Old Man Afraid of His Horses and his Chiefs. OGALALLA. (334)

1.53.4 CHA-SA-TONGA. Little Big Man. OGALALLA. (874)

1.53.5 WASHI-TA-TONGA. American Horse. OGALALLA. (876)

1.53.6 TA-OOP-CHE-KA. Little Wound. OGALALLA. (877)

1.54.1 SHUNKA-LA-LO-KA. He Dog. OGALALLA. (878)

1.54.2 MATO'-YU-MNI. Three Bears. OGALALLA. (880)

1.54.3 MA-WA-KA-YU-NA. Sword. OGALALLA. (881)

1.54.4 WM. GARNET, Intepreter.

1.54.5 OGALESHA. (Front.) OGALALA DAKOTA.

1.54.6 OGALESHA. (Profile.) OGALALA DAKOTA.

1.55.1 MA-TO'-CHU-TU'-HU. Bear's Rib. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (260)

1.55.2 MA-TO'-CHU-TU'-HU. Bear's Rib. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (261)

1.55.3 TA-TO'-KA-IN'-YAN-KA. Running Antelope. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (262)

1.55.4 TA-TO'-KA-IN'-YAN-KA. Running Antelope. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (263)

1.55.5 HE-MA'-ZA. Iron Horn. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (265)

1.55.6 HE-MA'-ZA. Iron Horn. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (264)

1.56.1 WA-KU'-TA-A-MA'-NI. Walking Shooter. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (266)

1.56.2 WA-KU'-TA-A-MA'-NI. Walking Shooter. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (267)

1.56.3 WA-KIN'-YAN-CHI'-TAN. Thunder Hawk. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (268)

1.56.4 WA-KIN'-YAN-CHi'-TAN. Thunder Hawk. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (269)

1.56.5 WI-CHA'-I-WE. Bloody Mouth. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (797)

1.56.6 WI-CHA'-I-WE. Bloody Mouth. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (798)

1.57.1 WA-KAN-TA-I-SHNI. Lost Medicine. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (799)

1.57.2 WA-KAN-TA-I-SHNI. Lost Medicine. (Profile) ONCPAPA (800)

1.57.3 HE-SHA'-PA. Black Horn. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (801)

1.57.4 HE-SHA'-PA. Black Horn. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (802)

1.57.5 P'SA. Bull Rushes. (Front.) ONCPAPA. (803)

1.57.6 P'SA. Bull Rushes. (Profile.) ONCPAPA. (804)

1.58.1 TCITAKUIA. (Front.) ONCPAPA DAKOTA.

1.58.2 TCITAKUIA. (Profile.) ONCPAPA DAKOTA.

1.58.3 CHE-TAN-ZHI. Yellow Hawk. SANS ARC. (195)

1.58.4 CHE-TAN-ZHI. Yellow Hawk. SANS ARC. (196)

1.58.5 WA-KU'-TA. The Shooter. SANTEE. (201)

1.58.6 WA-KU'-TA. The Shooter. SANTEE. (202)

1.59.1 WA'-PA-HA-SHA. Red Ensign. SANTEE. (203)

1.59.2 WA-KAN'-HDI-SHA'-PA. Black Lightning. SANTEE. (204)

1.59.3 O'-WAN-CHA-DU'-TA. Scarlet all Over. SANTEE. (205)

1.59.5 CHO'-TAN-KA-SHKA'-TA. Flute Player. SANTEE. (206)

1.59.6 A-KI'-CHI-TA-NA-ZIN. Standing Soldier. SANTEE. (207)

1.60.1 WAN-M'DI-TA-PA'-A'MA'-NI. Walks following the Eagle. SANTEE. (208)

1.60.2 TA'-SHUN-KA-WA-KAN'-WI-CHA. His Man Horse. SANTEE. (210)

1.60.3 MA-HP'I-YA-I-HUA-N. Coming among the Clouds. SANTEE. (211)

1.60.4 ZI-TKA'-DA-TO. Bluebird. SANTEE. (212)

1.60.5 MA-HPI'-YA-NA'-ZIN. Standing Cloud. SANTEE. (213)

1.60.6 HAN-YA'-TA-DU'-TU. Scarlet Night. SANTEE. (214)

1.61.1 HU-SHA-SHA. Red Legs. SANTEE. (215)

1.61.2 PE-HUI-UZA-TAN-KA. Great Scalper. SANTEE. (249)

1.61.3 TA-TAN'KA-NA'-ZIN. Standing Buffalo. SANTEE. (250)

1.61.4 WA-KAN'-KA. Medicine. SANTEE. (381)

1.61.5 YOUNG BRAVE. SANTEE. (248)

1.61.6 OLD BETTS. (Squaw.) SANTEE. (251)

1.62.1 SEAPHINE RENVILLE. (Interpreter.) SANTEE. (216)

1.62.2 TIWAKAN. (Front.) SISSETON DAKOTA.

1.62.3 TIWAKAN. (Profile.) SISSETON DAKOTA.

1.62.4 SINTEIUKAN. (Front.) SISSEON DAKOTA.

1.62.5 SINTEIUKAN. (Profile.) SISSETON DAKOTA.

1.62.6 ITOQNAKE. (Front.) SISSETON DAKOTA.

1.63.1 ITOQNAKE. (Profile.) SISSETON DAKOTA.

1.63.2 MAGABODBU. (Front.) SISSETON DAKOTA.

1.63.3 MAGABODBU. (Profile.) SISSETON DAKOTA.

1.63.4 MA-WA'-TAN'-NA-HAN'-SKA. Long Mandan. (187)

1.63.5 MA-WA'-TAN'-NA-HAN'-SKA. Long Mandan. (188)

1.63.6 MA-WA'-TAN'-NA-HAN'-SKA. Long Mandan. (189)

1.64.1. SUK-TAN'-KA-GE-LE-SKA. Spotted Horse. TWO KETTLE. (191)

1.64.2 AU-PE'-TO-KE-CHA. Other Day. WAHPETON. (193)

1.64.3 PA-DA'-NI-A-PA'-A-PA'. Struck by the Ree. YANKTON. (217)

1.64.4 PA-DA'-NI-A-PA'-A-PA'. Struck by the Ree. YANKTON. (249)

1.64.5 PSI-CHA-WA-KIN-YAN. Jumping Thunder. YANKTON. (218)

1.64.6 PSI-CHA-WA-KIN-YAN. Jumping Thunder. YANKTON. (219)

1.65.1 SI-HA'-HAN'-SKA. Long Foot. YANKTON. (220)

1.65.2 SI-HA'-HAN'-SKA. Long Foot. YANKTON. (906)

1.65.3 SI-HA'-HAN'-SKA. Long Foot. YANKTON. (907)

1.65.4 PTE-WA-KAN'. Medicine Cow. YANKTON. (222)

1.65.5 PTE-WA-KAN'. Medicine Cow. YANKTON. (223)

1.65.6 MA-GA'-SKA. White Swan. YANKTON. (221)

1.66.1 WA-HU'-KE-ZI-NOM'-PA. Two Lance. YANKTON. (225)

1.66.2 WA-HU'-KE-ZI-NOM'-PA. Two Lance. YANKTON. (226)

1.66.3 WA-HU'-KE-ZI-NOM'-PA. Two Lance. YANKTON. (227)

1.66.4 WI'-YA-KA-NO-GE. Feather in the Ear. YANKTON. (229)

1.66.5 ZIN-TKA'-CHI-STIN. Little Bird. YANKTON. (230)

1.66.6 ZIN-TKA'-CHI-STIN. Little Bird. YANKTON. (231)

1.67.1 WAN-M'DI-SHA'-PA. Black Eagle. YANKTON. (232)

1.67.2 WAN-M'DI-SHA'-PA. Black Eagle. YANKTON. (233)

1.67.3 MA-TO'-I-WAN'-KA'. Bear Lying Down. YANKTON. (234)

1.67.4 TALL FEATHER JOINING. (931)

1.67.5 HE-HA'-KA-A-MA'-NA. Walking Elk. YANKTON. (236)

1.67.6 HE-HA'-KA-A-NA'-ZIN. Standing Elk. YANKTON. (237)

1.68.1 MA-TO'-SA-BI-CHA. Smutty Bear. YANKTON. (238)

1.68.2 SMUTTY BEAR AND STRUCK BY THE REE. YANKTON. (240)

1.68.3 SMUTTY BEAR AND STRUCK BY THE REE. YANKTON. (241)

1.68.4 ZIN-TKA-SHA'-PA-MA'ZA. Iron Black Bird. YANKTON. (890)

1.68.5 WA-KIN-YAN-CHIN-STIN. Little Thunder. YANKTON. (892)

1.68.6 TA-TAN'-KA-WA-KAN'. Sacred Bull. YANKTON. (893)

1.69.1 ZIN-TKA'-KIN-YAN. Flying BIrd. YANKTON. (894)

1.69.2 CHIEF WITH THE BIG WAR BONNET. (895)

1.69.3 TO-KI'-YA-KTE. He Kills First. YANKTON. (896)

1.69.4 NA-GI'-WA-KAN'. Sacred Ghost. YANKTON. (897)

1.69.5 MA-TO'-HO-TAN'-KA. Bear with Big Voice. YANKTON. (898)

1.69.6 MA-TO'-HO-TAN'-KA. Bear with Big Voice. YANKTON. (899)

1.70.1 IN'-YAN-WAS-TE'. Pretty Rock. YANKTON. (900)

1.70.2 TO'-KA-YA-YU'-ZA. One who Catches the Enemy. YANKTON. (901)

1.70.3 KU-WA'S-CHIN-A-NIA-NI. One who Walks Home. YANKTON. (902)

1.70.4 MA-TO'-I-WAN-KA'-A-MA'-NI. Bear that Walks Lying Down. YANKTON. (903)

1.70.5 MA-TO'-WA-YU-MNI. The Bear that Turns Around. YANKTON. (904)

1.70.6 MA-TO'-WA-YU-MNI. The Bear that Turns Around. YANKTON. (905)

1.71.1 TA-TAN’-KA-WA-KAN. ? YANKTON. (text cut-off)

1.71.2 TA-TAN'-KA-WA-NA'-GI. Bull's Ghost. (Profile.) LOWER YANKTONAIS. (277)

1.71.3 MA-TO'-WI-TKO-TKO. Foolish Bear. (Front.) LOWER YANKTONAIS. (278)

1.71.4 MA-TO'-WI-TKO-TKO. Foolish Bear. (Profile.) LOWER YANKTONAIS. (279)

1.71.5 MA-TO'-NOM'-PA. Two Bears. (Front.) LOWER YANKTONAIS. (280)

1.71.6 MA-TO'-NOM'-PA. Two Bears. (Profile.) LOWER YANKTONAIS. (281)

1.72.1 MATONOPA. (Front.) DAKOTA, L. YANKTON.

1.72.2 MATONOPA. (Profile.) DAKOTA, L. YANKTON.

1.72.3 NA-ZU-LA-TAN'-KA. Big Head. (Profile.) UPPER YANKTONAIS. (271)

1.72.4 NA-ZU-LA-TAN'-KA. Big Head. (Front.) UPPER YANKTONAIS. (270)

1.72.5 I'-STA-SHA'-PA. Black Eye. (Front.) UPPER YANKTONAIS. (272)

1.72.6 I'-STA-SHA'-PA. Black Eye. (Profile.) UPPER YANKTONAIS. (273)

1.73.1 I-CHA'-SAN-TAN'-KA. Big Razor. (Front.) UPPER YANKTONAIS. (274)

1.73.2 I-CHA'-SAN-TAN'-KA. Big Razor. (Profile.) UPPER YANKTONAIS. (275)

1.73.3 NAZULATANKA. (Front.) UPPER YANKONAI DAKOTA.

1.73.4 NAZULATANKA. (Profile.) UPPER YANKONAI DAKOTA.

1.73.5 WA-KAN'-DU'-TA. Red Thunder. (Front.)

1.73.6 WA-KAN'-DU'-TA. Red Thunder. (Profile.)

1.74.1 HAV-KA-WASh-TI. Good Hawk. (Front.) (172)

1.74.2 HAV-KA-WASH-TI. Good Hawk. (Profile.) (173)

1.74.3 PE-HAN'-SA-A-MA'NI. Walking Crane. (Front.) (174)

1.74.4 PE-HAN'-SA-A-MA-N'I. Walking Crane. Walking Crane. (175)

1.74.5 WANMDI-ZI. Yellow Eagle. (Front.) (176)

1.74.6 WANMDI-ZI. Yellow Eagle. (Profile.) (177)

1.75.1 HATONA. Many Horns. (Front.) (732)

1.75.2 HATONA. Many Horns. (Profile.) (733)

1.75.3 I-STE-SA'-PA. Black Eye. (Front.) (734)

1.75.4 I-STE-SA'-PA. Black Eye. (Profile.) (735)

1.75.5 TA-TAN-KA-HAn-SKA. Long Fox. (Profile.) (737)

1.75.6 MA-ZA'-O-ZAN-ZAN. (916)

1.76.1 HE-HA'-KA-MA-ZU'. Iron Elk. (917)

1.76.2 WANMDI-YWAN'-KA. Great Eagle. (919)

1.76.3 (928)

1.76.4 MA-ZU'-KU'-TA. Iron Shooter. (927)

1.76.5 CUT NOSE. (925)

1.76.6 HIN-KAN-DU'-TA. Red Owl. (923)

1.77.1 WA-KAN'-O-ZAN-ZAN. Medicine Bottle. (932)

1.77.2 WAR DANCE. (244)

1.77.3 GENERAL SHERMAN AND COMMISSIONERS AT FORT LARAMIE. (815)

1.77.4 COMMISSIONERS IN COUNCIL, Fort Laramie. (816)

1.77.5 OLD MAN AFRAID OF HIS HORSES, AND GROUP. (817)

1.77.6 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (818)

1.78.1 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (819)

1.78.2 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (820)

1.78.3 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (822)

1.78.4 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (823)

1.78.5 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (824)

1.78.6 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (825)

1.79.1 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (826)

1.79.2 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (827)

1.79.3 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (828)

1.79.4 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (829)

1.79.5 MISCELLANEOUS GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (830)

1.79.6 SIOUX BURIAL. (831)

1.80.1 GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (832)

1.80.2 GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE (833)

1.80.3 GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (834)

1.80.4 GROUPS ABOUT FORT LARAMIE. (835)

1.80.5 INDIAN DELEGATION AT THE WHITE HOUSE. (838)

3. IOWAS

1.80.6 NAG-A-RASH. British. (386)
Became the first chief of the Iowas in 1862, upon the death of Nan-chee¬ning-a. Has always taken a prominent place in favor of civilization and the advancement of his tribe by education and work. Has made four visits to Washington and two to New York, the first being in 1847, when he travelled from Saint Joseph, Mo., to Baltimore in a wagon. Took part once in a great battle between the Otoes, Pawnees, Kickapoos, Pottawatomies, and Sacs and Foxes on one side, and the Snakes, Crows, Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Comanches, and Kiowas on the other, lasting from early dawn until dark. British shot 160 balls, ; 150 of the enemy were left on the field. Age, 68; height, 5.8 1/2; head, 22 7/8; chest, 47 1/2; weight, 193.

1.81.1 MAH-HEE. Knife. (388)

1.81.2 MAH-HEE. Knife. (389)
Third chief of the Iowas. When young, lived in Missouri, but afterward removed to Kansas. Enjoyed the confidence of the whites to a marked degree, and was mail-carrier for some time between the frontier and posts and the agency. Was among the first to take the lead in settling down to an agricultural life. Has always been a hard-working man, but at one time was dissipated, and once, when under the influence of liquor, killed his father. Is a strictly temperate man now, but his rapidly¬failing health will soon unfit him for his usual labor, and his example in the tribe as an industrious man will soon be lost. Age, 56; height, 5.10; head, 22 3/4; chest, 39 1/2; weight, 172.

1.81.3 TAH-RA-KEE. Deer Ham. (391)

1.81.4 TAH-RA-KEE. Deer Ham. (395)
Was fourth chief of the tribe until October, 1876, when he was deposed for persistent interference with the business of the agency. he had been suspended before, but was reinstated by another agent. Age, 50 years; height, 5.8 1/2; head, 22; chest, 41 1/2; weight, 179.

1.81.5 KI-HE-GA-ING-A. Little Chief. (390)
Fifth chief of the Iowas. Enlisted in the Northern Army and participated in the late war of the rebellion, serving two years. Was promised the position of a chief if he enlisted, and upon his return the promise was made good. Age, 43; height, 5.10; head, 22 3/4; chest, 43; weight, 192.

1.81.6 KRA-TEN-THA-WAH. Black Hawk. (387)
Was sixth chief of the Iowas. Died January, 1871, aged about 30 years; height, 6 feet; weight, 170 pounds.

1.82.1 NAN-CHEE-NING-A. No Heart. (392)

1.82.2 NAN-CHEE-NING-A. No Heart. (393)

1.82.3 NAN-CHEE-NING-A. No Heart. (394)
Was first chief of the Iowas. Died in 1862, aged 65; height, 5.10; weight, 170.

1.82.4 A CHIEF. (921)

1.82.5 GROUP, comprising most of the above numbers. (922)

4. KAW OR KANSAS

1.82.6 LITTLE BEAR. (397)

1.83.1 KA-KE-GA-SHA. (Sitting.) (398)

1.83.2 KA-KE-GA-SHA. (Standing.) (399)

1.83.3 SAC CHIEF. (708)

1.83.4

1.83.5 GROUP OF FOX CHIEFS. (805)

5. MANDANS

1.83.6 WA-SHU-NA-KOO-RA. Rushing War Eagle. (1006)
The present head chief of the Mandans, a man noted for kindliness and benevolence. Age, 43; height, 5.7 3/4; head, 24 1/2; chest, 38.

1.84.1 ME-RA-PA-RA-PA. Lance. (1005)
Head soldier or brave. Age, 38; height, 5.8 1/2; head 22 3/4; chest 38 1/2.

1.84.2 E-STA-POO-STA. Running Face. (1007)
Young warrior, son of Red Cow, a "big chief," who was too old to travel, and the son sent in his place. Age, 23; height, 5.6; head, 21 1/2; chest 37 3/4.

1.84.3 CHARLES PAPINEAU. Interpreter. (884)
Born in Montreal in 1820. Has lived in the Mandan country since 1839. Speaks Arickaree, Crow, Sioux, Gros Bentres, Mandan, French, and English.

1.84.4 TGECAQADAQIC. (Front.) HIDATSA.

1.84.5 TGECAQADAQIC. (Profile.) HIDATSA.

6. MISSOURIAS

1.84.6 THRACH-TCHE. True Eagle. (481)
A full-blood Missouria, and nephew of Ah-ho-che-ka-thocka (Quapaw Indian Striker), a title gained by his bravery in battle against the Quapaws, and who was head chief. At his (Ah-he-cho-ka-thocka's) death, the hereditary successor, Good Talker, was assassinated by Shungech-hoy and others, when the line of descent fell on Ture Eagle, who became chief in 1860, and held the position of Missouria chief in the confederated Otoes and Missourias until 1874, when he resigned in favor of his nephew. Is now about 80 years of age, 6 fett in height, with a stout, well¬proportioned frame.

1.85.1 NOCH-PE-WORA. The One they are Afraid Of. (503)
Is a cousin of True Eagle, and chief of the Eagle band of Missourias. Is of a mild, genial disposition, with but little force of character. Age, 45; height, 5.8 1/2; weight, 155; head 22 1/2; chest, 35.

1.85.2 WA-THOCK-A-RUCHY. One who eats his Food Raw. (Sitting.) (484)

1.85.3 WA-THOCK-A-RUCHY. One who eats his Food Raw. (Standing, full.) (485)
His father was of the Bear band of Otoes, and his mother of the Eagle band of Missourias. He inherited a chieftaincy among the Missourias, and succeeded to that position upon the death of his uncle, White Water, in 1868, when he took the name of LOD-NOO-WAH-HOO-WA, or Pipe-Stem. Lacks force of character, but is of a mild disposition and well disposed. Is about 5 feet in height, and of a well-developed physical organization.

1.85.4 MUNCHA-HUNCHA. Big Bear, or Joseph Powell. (486)
Is a full-blooded Missouria. Succeeded his grandfather, Cow-he-pa-ha, as chief of the Bear band, in 1870. When a young man he lived much of his time among the whites. Possessing more than ordinary intelligence, he is at present the leading spirit of the Otoes and Missourias in the industrial pursuits of civilized life. These qualities have engendered much jealousy in the breasts of the older chiefs, who throw many obstacles in his way. Besides his good mental qualities he possesses a splendid physique. Height, 5.11; wieght, 225; head, 23 1/2; chest 42.

1.85.5 BLACK ELK. (498)

1.85.6 MUNTCEHUNTCE. (Front.) OTO & MISSOURI.

1.86.1 MUNTCEHUNTCE. (Profile.) OTO & MISSOURI.

7. OMAHAS

1.86.2 GRE-DTHE-NUZHE. Standing Hawk and squaw. (466)
The oldest chief in the tribe, and consequently one whose words always command attention in their councils. This view represents him leading his pony, followed by his faithful squaw.

1.86.3 O-HUN-GA-NUZHE. Standing at the End. (467)
A brave, nearly nude, decorated with "war-paint" and astride a characteristic Indian pony.

1.86.4 MO-HA-NUZHE. Standing Bent. (468)
A policeman, or one appointed by the chiefs to preserve order in the
village.

1.86.5 GI-HE-GA. Chief. (463)
One of the nine chiefs who govern the tribe, holding their positions by hereditary descent.

1.86.6 BETSY. (469)
A noted character among the Omahas, an exponent of women's rights. Has always accompanied the tribe on their annual buffalo-hunts, and participates in the chase with the men. Speaks three Indian languages, besides French and English.

1.87.1 (460)

1.87.2 GROUP OF SCHOOL-CHILDREN. (472)

1.87.3 GROUP OF SCHOOL-CHILDREN. (473)

1.87.4 GROUP OF SCHOOL-CHILDREN. (475)

1.87.5 GROUP OF SCHOOL-CHILDREN. (476)

1.87.6 EBA-HOM-BA'S LODGE. (478)

1.88.1 BETSY. (see 1.86.6) (470)

1.88.2 AGENCY BUILDING. (457)

1.88.3 AGENCY BUILDING. (458)

1.88.4 THE VILLAGE OF THE OMAHAS. (1871.) (462)

1.88.5 GI-HE-GA'S LODGE. (464)

1.88.6 VIEW FROM BLACKBIRD HILL. (See 1.87.1) (459)

1.89.1 VILLAGE SCENE. (479)

1.89.2 A BRAVE. (477)

1.89.3 INDIAN CARPENTERS BUILDING HOUSES FOR THE TRIBE. (471)

8. OSAGES

1.89.4 JOSEPH, PAW-NE-NO-PA-ZHE. Not Afraid of the Pawnees. (511)
Governor or chief of the tribe. Was born on the Osage reservation when in Kansas, and when 12 years of age was placed in a Catholic mission, where he received a good English education. He still retains the old customs and habits of his tribe, however. Is a brave and warlike chief, but yet exerts all his influence to secure peace between his people and the whites. IS about 40 years of age, 6 feet in height, with a large and commanding physique; head, 22 1/4; chest, 41.

1.89.5 SHONGA-SA-PA. Black Dog. (886)
The youngest of the six principal chiefs of the tribe. Is 28 years of age, and was born on the present reservation. Is the descendant of a long line of chiefs, one of whom was principal in establishing peace between the Government and the wild tribes. With the governor, Joseph, he visited Washington in 1876 to adjust various business matters in connection with his tribe. Age, 28; height, 5.11 1/2; head, 22 3/4; chest, 38.

1.89.6 KE-SI-SI-GRE. A Distant Land. (510)

1.90.1 MAH-KEA-PU-AT-SEE. One Who Reaches to the Sky. (512)

1.90.2 JOSEPH AND BLACK DOG. (888)

1.90.3 JOSEPH, BLACK DOG, OGEAS CAPTAIN, AND J. N. FLORER. (889)

9. OTOES

1.90.4 AR-KE-KE-TAH. Stand by It. (480)
Is a full-blooded Otoe Indian. He was a leading warrior in his tribe, and during the early settlement of Nebraska, when an emigrant train had been attacked on Big Sandy Creek, and robbed of all they had by a party of Pawnees, Ar-ke-ke-tah, leading a band of Otoes, fell on them, and, killing the entire party, restored the goods back to the emigrants, for which he gained notoriety, and received papers commendatory of this and other valuable services rendered the whites. By being a man of deep scheming and cuning, he succeeded in gaining the position of head chief of the tribe, while on a visit to Washington, in 1854, when the treaty was concluded, in which the Otoes ceded to the Government the southeastern part of Nebraska. He was deposed from his chiefship in 1872, re-instated in 1873, but has been inactive as a chief since, and has lost his influence in the tribe. He is still living, about 65 years of age, and 5 feet 8 inches high, with square, well-built frame.

1.90.5 SHUN-GECH-HOY. Medicine Horse. (482)

1.90.6 SHUN-GECH-HOY. Medicine Horse. (492)

1.91.1 SHUN-GECH-HOY. Medicine Horse. (493)

1.91.2 SHUN-GECH-HOY. Medicine Horse. (502)
His father was an Otoe, and his mother a Missouria Indian. By hereditary descent he became, in 1854, head chief of the Bear band of Otoes, and being ambitious, worked himself finally into the position of head chief of the Otoes and Missourias. In 1874 he led a portion of the tribe away from their reservation, in violation of law and agency regulations, for which he, with five others, was arrested and confined for a time at Fort Wallace. In consequence, he became alienated from the agency and main part of the tribe, and lost his position as chief. Has features remarkably coarse; has a very stern, fierce disposition,; is a deep schemer; would be willing to sacrifice almost any interest of his tribe in order in maintain a supremacy over them, and has been engaged in many stratagems of the kind. He is tenacious of old Indian customs, opposed to improvement that makes innovations thereon, and is a heavy clog on the tribe in their endeavors to advance in civilized pursuits. In stature, he is about 5 feet 9 inches, with a heavy-set, well-developed muscular frame; about 60 years of age.

1.91.3 LOD-NOO-WA-INGA. Little Pipe. (487)

1.91.4 LOD-NOO-WA-INGA. Little Pipe. (489)

1.91.5 LOD-NOO-WA-INGA. Little Pipe. (490)
Is a son of Hick-a-poo or Kick-a-poo, formerly a prominent chief of the tribe. The chiefship had been hereditary through many successors, and after the death of Hic-a-poo, the present Little Pipe, in 1858, took his place. He was one of the followers of Shun-gech-hoy in 1874; was arrested and imprisoned with him, and has not since been recognized as a chief. He is of a mild disposition, well disposed towrd improvement, but quiet and without much individual force of character. Has been under unfavorable influences, and therefore makes but little progress. He is abut 50 yers of age, 5 feet 7 1/2 inches in stature, head 23 inches, chest 36, and weighs 155.

1.91.6 PAH-HO-CHA-INGA. Little Iowa. (488)
Generally known by his more proper name of Baptiste Devoin, is a son of John Devoin, who is half French and half Missouria Indian. His mother is half Omaha, one-quarter French, and one-quarter Iowa Indian. He was partially educated at the Pawnee Mission, at Belleview, Nebr.; can read, write, and speak the English language tolerably well; also speaks Pawnee, Omaha, and French. He married into the Otoe tribe, and has been employed at Otoe agency in the several positions of teamster, farmer, interpreter, and miller, under former agents. In 1869, he was employed as interpreter for the tribe, and has continued in that office until the present. In height he is 5 feet 9 3/4 inches, head measurement 23 1/2 inches, chest 44 inches, and weighs 220 pounds. He is about 40 years of age, and quite corpulent.

1.92.1 TCHA-WAN-NA-GA-HE. Buffalo Chief. (495)
Is an Otoe Indian, though his grandfather belongs to the Iowa tribe. He was, when a young man, a self-constituted chief, leading a portion of the Buffalo band of Otoes, at a time when Sack-a-pie was chief, and at whose death he became the recognized head chief of the band, which position he held until 1874. He is still living; is about 80 years of age, in stature 5 feet 6 inches, and weighs about 160 pounds. He is of rather a mild disposition, though decided in his ways; concilitory to the whites, and has gained many friends among them.

1.92.2 BAPTISTE DEVOIN AND TCHA-WAN-NA-GA-HE. (497)
The same as given and described in Nos. 488 and 495.

1.92.3 E'EN-BRICK-TO. Blackbird.
OP-PO-HOM-MON-NE. Buck Elk Walking. (500)
The first is half Otoe and half Omaha; the second, who is represented sitting, is a full-blood Missouria.

1.92.4 INSTA-MUNTHA. Iron Eagle.
KO-INGA. Little Thunder.
OP-PO-HOM-MON-NE.
E'EN-BRICK-TO. (501)

1.92.5 LITTLE PIPE, with Missouria chief and interpreter. (491)

1.92.6 MEDICINE HORSE, BABTISTE DEVOIN, and interpreter. (496)

1.93.1 MUSKEGOGI. (Front.) OTO.

1.93.2 MUSKEGOGI. (Profile.) OTO.

1.93.3 WETCUNIE. (Front.) OTO.

1.93.4 WETCUNIE. (Profile.) OTO.

1.93.5 BATISTE DE ROIN. (Front.) OTO.

1.93.6 BATISTE DE ROIN. (Profile.) OTO.

1.94.1 HA'-RE-GA'-RE. (Front.) OTO.

1.94.2 HA'-RE-GA'-RE. (Profile.) OTO.

1.94.3 ARKIKI'TA. (Front.) OTO.

1.94.4 ARKIKI'TA. (Profile.) OTO.

10. PONCAS

1.94.5 ASH-NOM-E-KAH-GA-HE. Lone Chief.
TA-TONKA-NUZHE. Standing Buffalo.
WA-GA-SA-PI. Iron Whip.
TASTE-CO-MANI. Fast Walker. (517-518)

1.94.6 WA-GA-SA-PI. Iron Whip. (519)

1.95.1 NATIVE DRAWING. (521)

1.95.2 HDE-DA-SKA. White Eagle. PONCA. (1081)
Head chief. Age, 41 years; height, 6 feet 2 inches; circumference of head, 22 1/4 inches, circumference of chest, 38 1/2 inches.

1.95.3 TA-TAU-KA-NU-ZHE. Standing Buffalo. PONCA. (1082)
Age, 44 years; height, 5 feet 11 1/2 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest 42 1/2 inches.

1.95.4 MA-CHU-NU-ZHE. Standing Bear. PONCA. (1083)
Age, 51 years; height, 5 feet 10 1/4 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest, 40 inches.

1.95.5 UMP-PA-TONGA. Big Elk. PONCA. (1084)
Age, 36 years; height, 5 feet 9 3/4 inches; circumference of head, 23 inches; circumference of chest, 40 inches.

1.95.6 KHA-KA-SAPA. Black Crow. PONCA. (1085)
Age, 52 years; height, 5 feet 8 1/2 inches; circumference of head, 22 1/2 inches; circumference of chest, 39 1/2 inches.

1.96.1 MA-GA-SKA. White Swan. PONCA. (1086)
Age, 51 years; height, 5 feet 8 inches; circumference of head, 22 1 / 2 inches; circumference of chest, 39 inches.

1.96.2 GIHEGA. Big Chief. PONCA. (1087)
Age, 41 years; height, 5 feet 10 1/2 inches; circumference of head, 23 1/2 inches; circumference of chest, 40 inches.

1.96.3 SHU-DA-GA-KA. Smoke Maker. PONCA. (1088)
Age, 51 years; height, 5 feet 9 3/8 inches; circumference of ehad, 23 1/2 inches; circumference of chest, 42 1/2 inches.

1.96.4 MA-CHU-HINKTH-TA. Hairy Bear. PONCA. (1089)
Age, 40 years; height, 5 feet 11 3/4 inches; circumference of head, 23 1/2 inches; circumference o chest, 38 1/2 inches.

1.96.5 WASE-A-TONGA. Big Snake. PONCA. (1090)
Age, 45 years; height, 6 feet 1 1/4 inches; circumference of head, 24 1/2 inches; circumference of chest, 43 inches.

1.96.6 GROUP of four chiefs and two interpreters of the Ponca delegation. (1093)

11. WINNEGAOS

1.97.1 JNO. M. ST. CYR. (1080)
A delegate representing the Wisconsin Winnebagoes. Has been to Washington three times. His mother was a relative of Little Priest, one of the most prominent chiefs of the tribe, and his father a Frenchman.

1.97.2 ?

1.97.3 WAH-KUNK-SCHA-KAW, and daughter. (812)
Wife of "Martin Van Buren," a former prominent chief of the tribe.

1.97.4 KA-RA-CHO-WE-KAW. A Blue Cloud Passing By. (814)

1.97.5 WINNEBAGO CHILDREN. (809)

1.97.6 WINNEBAGO CHILD. (810)

IV. PAWNEES

1. ARICKAREES

1.98.1 KU-NUGH-NA-GIVE-NUK. Rushing Bear. (1042)
Head chief; age, 56; height, 5.8 1/2; head, 22 3/4; chest 39 1/2.

1.98.2 E-GUS-PAH. Bull Head. (1044)
Age, 57; height, 5.4 1/2; head 23 1/4; chest, 42 1/2.

1.98.3 CHE-WA-KOO-KA-TI. Black Fox. (1043)
Son of Black Bear, a great chief of the tribe. Age, 23; height, 5.5; head, 24; chest 36 1/4.

1.98.4 KNUDINAGUIAQ. ARIKARA.

1.98.5 BLACK BUFFALO. (717)

1.98.6 LONG KNIFE. (718)

2. KEECHIES

1.99.1 KNEE-WAR-WAR. (Front.) (411)

1.99.2 KNEE-WAR-WAR. (Profile.) (412)

3. PAWNEES

1.99.3 PETA-LA-SHA-RA. Man and Chief. (530)

1.99.4 PETA-LA-SHA-RA. Man and Chief. (531)

1.99.5 PETA-LA-SHA-RA. Man and Chief. (532)
Reputed head chief of the Pawnees, though really chief only of his own band, the Chowee. His claim was based partly on the fact of having been the first signer of their treaty of 1857. Being a good Indian orator, and of dignified bearing, he was generally awarded the first place in their councils, and led off in speech. In 1820, it is said that he put a stop to the custom, then prevalent among the Pawnees, of offering human sacrifices, but only by a display of great courage. In 1825 he visited Washington with a delegation of his tribe, and attracted much attention by his fine presence. Has always been friendly to the whites and in favor of the advancement of his tribe in civilized habits, although very slow himself to adopt new ideas. He died in the summer of 1874 from an accidental pistol-shot. Had but one wife, and she survives him.

1.99.6 LA-TA-CUTS-LA-SHAR. Eagle Chief. SKEEDEE. (533)
At present the oldest, and consequently the head chief of the tribe.

1.100.1 LA-ROO-CHUK-ALA-SHAR. Sun Chief. CHOWEE. (534)
A son of Peta-la-sha-ra and head chief of the Chowee band; also a leader in the councils. Height, 5.9; head, 22; chest, 36 1/2.

1.100.2 TUH-COD-IX-TE-CAH-WAH. Brings Herds. SKEEDEE. (535)
Height, 5.10; head, 22; chest, 42.

1.100.3 TU-TUC-A-PICISH-TE-RUK. Gives to the Poor. SKEEDEE. (543)
A soldier or policeman of the Skeedees. Height, 5.9; head 22 1/2; chest, 42.

1.100.4 SQUAW of TU-TUC-A PICISH-TE-RUK. SKEEDEE. (545)

1.100.5 LA-HIC-TA-HA-LA-SHA. Pipe Chief. CHOWEE. (548)
One of the signers of the treaty of 1858.
ARU-SAW-LA-KIT-TOWY. A Fine Horse. SKEEDEE.
SKI-AR-RA-RA-SHAR. Lone Chief. CHOWEE.
SE-TED-E-ROW-WEET. One Aimed At. SKEEDEE.
COT-TA-RA-TET-GOOTS. Struck with a Tomahawk. SKEEDEE. (528)

1.100.6 GROUP OF FOUR BROTHERS OF THE KIT-KA-HOCT BAND, viz:
LA-ROO-RUTK-A-HAW-LA-SHAR. Night Chief.
LA-ROO-RA-SHAR-ROO-COSH. A Man that left his Enemy lying the Water.
A noted brave. Height, 5.10; head, 23; chest, 39.
TEC-TA-SHA-COD-DIC. One who strikes the Chiefs first.
Second chief of his band, and one of four noted brothers (see No. 552), pre-eminent in their tribe for bravery in war and wisdom in council. Height, 5.8; head, 23; chest 39.
TE-LOW-A-LU-LA-SHA. Sky Chief.
A chief, and a brave leader of his band, taking the first place in war or peace. Was killed by the Sioux in the massacre of the Pawnees in 1873, while hunting buffalo in the valley of the Republican.
BAPTISTE BAYHYLLE, or LA-SHARA-SE-RE-TER-REK.
One whom the Great Spirit smiles upon.
United States interpreter, French half-breed. (553)

1.101.1 NIGHT CHIEF AND THE MAN THAT LEFT HIS ENEMY LYING IN THE WATER. (550)

1.101.2 NIGHT CHIEF AND THE MAN THAT LEFT HIS ENEMY LYING IN THE WATER. (551)

1.101.3 TE-LOW-A-LUT-LA-SHA. Sky Chief. (560) The same as in No. 552, No.4

1.101.4/1.101.5 (558-559)
COO-TOWY-GOOTS-00-TER-A-OOS. Blue Hawk. PETAHOWERAT.
TUC-CA-RIX-TE-TA-RU-PE-ROW. Coming around with the Herd. PETAHOWERAT.

1.101.6 PERRUS KITTY-BUSK. Small Bop. SKEEDEE. (556)

1.102.1 LOO-KIT-TOWY-HOO-RA. On a fine Horse. PETAHOWERAT. (575)

1.102.2 LUH-SA-COO-RE-CULLA-HA. Particular in the Time of Day. KIT-KA-HOCT. (576)

1.102.3 LA-ROO-CHUK-A-RAR-00. The Sun Coming in. CHOWEE. (577)

1.102.4 SE-RAR-WOT-COWY. Behind the one that strikes first. SKEEDEE. (578)

1.102.5 CAW-CAW-KITTY-BUSK. Little Raven. SKEEDEE. (579)

1.102.6 CAW-CAW-KITTY-BUSK. Little Raven. SKEEDEE. (585)

1.103.1 CAW-CAW-KITTY-BUSK. Little Raven. SKEEDEE. (607)

1.103.2 AS-SAU-TAW-KA. White Horse. PETAHOWERAT. (580)

1.103.3 LOOTS-TOW-OOTS. Rattlesnake. SKEEDEE. (581)

1.103.4 HE-WUK-O-WE-TE-RAH-ROOK. Acting a Fox. SKEEDEE. (583)

1.103.5 KIT-TOOX. Beaver. KIT-KA-HOCT. (584)

1.103.6 AS-SOW-WEET. (586)

1.104.1 TER-RA-RE-CAW-WAH. PETAHOWERAT. (589)
Died in 1875; the oldest chief in the tribe. Very prominent in his day as a brave warrior.

1.104.2 CAW-HEEK. An Old Man. KIT-KA-HOCT. (59 1)

1. 104.3 LOO-KIT-TOWY-HIS-SA. On a Fine Horse. SKEEDEE.
ARE-WAUKS. A Male Cal. CHOWEE. (593)

1.104.4 LOOTS-TOW-OOS. Rattlesnake, and squaw. SKEEDEE. (594)

1.104.5 E-RAH-COT-TA-HOT. In the Front of Battle, and squaw. SKEEDEE. (595)
Alias Jim Curoux. A steady worker, and wearing citizens' dress.

1.104.6 A-RUS-SAW-E-ROOT-COWY. A Nice Horse. SKEEDEE. (596)

1.105.1 CU-ROOX-TA-RI-HA. Good Bear. SKEEDEE. (597)

1.105.2 TIT-TOWY-OOT-SE. Beginning to go to War. SKEEDEE. (598)
Alias Johnson Wright. A civilized Indian.

1.105.3 KE-WUK-O-CAR-WAR-RY. Fox on the War-Path. SKEEDEE. (599)
Alias Fat George. Assistant carpenter at the agency.

1.105.4 CAW-CAW-KE-REEK. Crow Eyes. PETAHOWERAT. (600)

1.105.5 KEE-WEEK-O-WAR-UXTY. Medicine Bull. SKEEDEE. (601)

1.105.6 TEC-TA-SHA-COD-DIC. One who strikes the Chiefs first. KIT-KA-HOCT. (602)

1.106.1 LE-TA-CUTS-A-WAR-UXTY. Medicine Eagle. SKEEDEE. (603)

1.106.2 TA-CAW-DEEX-TAW-SEE-UX. Driving a Herd. SKEEDEE. (604)

1.106.3 US-CAW-DA-WAR-UXTY. Medicine Antelope. KIT-KA-HOCT. (605)

1.106.4 TER-RA-HA-TU-RIHA. Good Buffalo. PETAHOWERAT. (606)

1.106.5 SIT-TE-ROW-E-HOO-RA-REEK. Seen by All. SKEEDEE. (608)

1.106.6 PORTRAIT OF A PAWNEE without information as to name or history. (612)

1.107.1 THE VILLAGE OF THE PAWNEES. (523, 567-8)
Situated on the Loupe Fork of the Platte River, about 100 miles west of Omaha. It was divided into two parts, the Skeedees occupying one part by themselves, and the other three bands jointly in the other. The entire village accommodated about 2,500 people. Each lodge was capable of holding several families; they were formed by erecting several stout posts in a circle, forked at the top, into which cross-beams were laid, and against these long poles were inclined from the outside toward the centre; all was then covered with brush, and finally with earth, leaving a hole at the apex for the escape of smoke, and a long tunnel-like entrance at the base. This village is now (1876) entirely destroyed, and the Indians removed to the Indian Territory.

1.107.2 SCHOOL BUILDING on the Pawnee reserve, on the Loupe Fork, Nebraska. (537)

1.107.3 GROUP OF THE HEAD MEN OF THE TRIBE. (573)

1.107.4 GROUP OF THE HEAD MEN OF THE TRIBE. (574)

1.107.5 GROUP OF INDIAN CHILDREN (attending the boarding school on the reservation). (525)

1.107.6 GROUP OF INDIAN CHILDREN (attending the boarding school on the reservation). (526)

1.108.1 GROUP OF INDIAN CHILDREN (attending the boarding school on the reservation). (527)
The first shows the younger children of the primary classes, and the two latter numbers the older and more advanced scholars.

1.108.2/1.108.3/1.108.4 (570-2)
GROUPS OF CHILDREN in their every-day attire, which consists principally of the covering with which nature first clothed them.

1.108.5 NATIVE PAINTING ON A BUFFALO SKIN. (540)
A biography, or narration of the principal events in the life of a prominent chief, by the means of picture-writing.

1.108.6 MISCELLANEOUS PORTRAIT OF PAWNEES without information as to name or history. (547)

MISCELLANEOUS. PORTRAITS OF PAWNEES without information as to name or history.
1.109.1 (549) 1.109.2 1562) 1.109.3 (588) 1.109.4 (590) 1.109.5 (564) 1.109.6 (565) 1.110.1 (566)

4. WACOS

1.110.2 LONG SOLDIER. (Front.) (742)

1.110.3 LONG SOLDIER. (Profile.) (743)

5. WICHITAS

1.110.4 BUFFALO GOAD. (Front.) (165)

1.110.5 BUFFALO GOAD. (Profile.) (167)

1.110.6 BUFFALO GOAD. (Profile.) (166)
Was one of the great delegation of chiefs from the Indian Territory in 1872, among whom were Little Raven, Little Robe, Bird Chief, &c. He’d impressed all as being a man of more than usual ability and dignity.

1.111.1 BUFFALO GOAD. (Profile.) (168)
(See 1.110.6)

1.111.2 ASSADAWA. (Front.) (744)

1.111.3 ASSADAWA. (Profile.) (745)

1.111.4 ESQUITZCHEW. (Front.) (746)

1.111.5 ESQUITZCHEW. (Profile.) (747)

1.111.6 BLACK HORSE. (748)

1.112.1 TSODIAKO. (Front.) WICHITA.

1.112.2 TSODIAKO. (Profile.) WICHITA.

V. SHOSHONES

1. BANNACKS

1.112.3 FAMILY GROUP. (48)
In 1871, while returning from the exploration of the Yellowstone region, and while encamped near the head of the Medicine Lodge Creek, the camp of a family of the Sheep-eater band of Bannacks was accidentally discovered near by, almost completely hidden in a grove of willows. Their tent or tepee is made of a few boughs of willow, about which are thrown an old canvas picked up in some of the settlements. The present of a handful of sugar and some coffee reconciled them to having their photographs taken. In the group are the father and mother and five children. The Sheep-eaters are a band of the Bannacks, running in the mountains north of the Kamas prairies, and are so shy and timid that they are but rarely seen.

1.112.4 GROUP of a miscellaneous crowd at the agency.

1.112.5 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (51)

1.112.6 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (52)
Eleven views [continued on 1.113], showing the various operations of the agency, some of the idlers, and a few groups of squaws and pappooses.

1.113.1 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (53)

1.113.2 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (54)

1.113.3 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (55)

1.113.4 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (56)

1.113.5 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (57)

1.113.6 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (58)

1.114.1 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (59)

1.114.2 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (60)

1.114.3 GROUPS AND SCENES about the agency. (61)

1.114.4 PAW-HOO-CUT-TAW-WAH. Knee-Mark on the Ground on Stooping to Drink. SKEEDEE. (610)

1.114.5 (1100)

1.114.6 (1101)

1.115.1 (1102)

1.115.2 (1103)

1.115.3 (1104)

1.115.4 (1105)

1.115.5 (1106)

1.115.6 (1108)

2. COMANCHES

1.116.1 ASA HAVIE. The Milky Way. (Front.) PENETATHKA. (128)

1.116.2 ASA HAVIE. The Milky Way. (Profile.) PENETHKA. (129)
Is one of the head men of his band, dividing the office of chief with Toshoway. (No. 134.) Has been one of the most noted raiders in Texas, leading many bands of the restless young men of his tribe, until about ten years since, when he was badly wounded in an enounter and left for dead upon the field. Is now endevoring to live in the white man's ways, having had a comfortable log house built for himself, and a few acres of ground enclosed, which he is successfully cultivating. This portrait of Asa Havie was made in 1872, while on a visit to Washington with a delegtaion of his tribe. Age, about 45; height, 5.9 1/2; head, 23 1/2; chest, 44 1/2; weight, about 299 pounds.

1.116.3 WIFE OF ASA HAVIE. (Front.)

1.116.4 WIFE OF ASA HAVIE. (Profile.)
Age, about 40; height, 5.4; head, 23; chest, 38; weeght, 170 pounds.

1.116.5 TIMBER BLUFF. (Front.)

1.116.6 TIMBER BLUFF. (Profile.)

1.117.1 TO-SHO-WAY. Silver Knife. (Front.) PENETATHKA. (134)

1.117.2 TO-SHO-WAY. Silver Knife. (Profile.) PENETATHKA. (135)
One of the chiefs of his band, sharing the position with Asa havie. Is noted for good sense and fair dealing, and has long been friendly to the whites. In youth, however, was not behind the other adventurous spirits of this tribe in predatory exploits and raids into Texas. Age, about 55; height, 5.6; head, 22 1/4; chest, 41; weight, 168.

1.117.3 WIFE OF TOSHOWAY. (Front.)

1.117.4 ASA-TO-YET. Gray Leggings. (Front.) PENETATHKA. (138)

1.117.5 ASA-TO-YET. Gray Leggings. (Front.) PENETATHKA. (139)

1.117.6 ASA-TO-YET. Gray Leggings. (Front.) PENETATHKA. (140)
One of the leading men of his tribe, taking an active interestin their advancement. Lives in a house, cultivates the ground, and has a good lot of stock. Speaks English fluently. Age, 45; height, 5.10; head, 34; chest, 42.

1.118.1 CHEEVERS. He Goat. TAMPARETHKA. (141)

1.118.2 CHEEVERS. He Goat. TAMPARETHKA. (142)
A prominent and influential man in his tribe, and chief of his band.

1.118.3 "COMANCHE WOMAN."

1.118.4 MOTHER OF CHEEVERS. TAMPARETAKA. (145)

1.118.5 MOTHER OF CHEEVERS. TAMPARETAKA. (146)

1.118.6 QUIRTS-QUIP. Chewing Elk. TAMPARETHKA. (147)
One of the chiefs of the tribe; a shrewd and able person, with considerable executive and financial ability. Age, 45; height, 5.6 3/4; head, 23; chest, 39.

1.119.1 HO-WE-OH. Gap in the Salt. TAMPARETHKA. (149)

1.119.2 HO-WE-OH. Gap in the Salt. TAMPARETHKA. (150)
A chief who is doing his best to lead his tribe in civilized ways, as well as to walk in that way himself. Age,--; height, 5.11 1/2; head, 23; chest, 43.

1.119.3 DAUGHTER OF GAP IN THE SALT. TAMPARETHKA. (151)

1.119.4 DAUGHTER OF GAP IN THE SALT. TAMPARETHKA. (152)

1.119.5 PARRY-WAH-SA-MEN. Ten Bears. TAMPARETHKA. (153)

1.119.6 PARRY-WAH-SA-MEN. Ten Bears. TAMPARETHKA. (154)
Formerly head chief of the Tamparethkas band of Comanches. He died in November, 1872, just after his return from Washington with a visiting delegation from his tribe. Was friendly to the whites, and a man of influence among his people, maintaining this influence and his chieftainship to the unusual age of 80 years.

1.120.1 BUFFALO HUMP. TAMPARETHKA. (155)

1.120.2 BUFFALO HUMP. TAMPARETHKA. (156)

1.120.3 JIM. TAMPARETHKA. (157)

1.120.4 JIM. TAMPARETHKA. (158)

1.120.5 KOBI. (Front.) COMANCHE.

1.120.6 KOBI. (Profile.) COMANCHE.

3. KIOWAS

2.1.1 LONE WOLF. (Front.) (402)

2.1.2 LONE WOLF. (Profile.) (403)

2.1.3 SQUAW OF LONE WOLF. (Front.) (404)

2.1.4 SQUAW OF LONE WOLF. (Profile.) (405)

2.1.5 SQUAW OF LONE WOLF. (Sitting.) (406)

2.1.6 SLEEPING WOLF AND SQUAW. (407)

2.2.1 SON OF THE SUN. (Front.) (408)

2.2.2. SON OF THE SUN. (Profile.) (409)

2.2.3 NATIVE DRAWING. (410)

2.2.4 SITIMGIA. (Front.) KAIOWA.

2.2.5 SITIMGIA. (Profile.) KAIOWA.

4.SHOSHONES

2.2.6 VILLAGE IN SOUTH PASS. (657)
During the expedition of 1870, the United States Geological Survey of the Territories came across the above village of the Shoshones, numbering nearly one hundred lodges, encamped among the southern foot-hills of the Wind River Mountains, where the above and some of the following views were secured. They were under the well-known chief Washakie, and were on their way to the Wind River Valley to hunt buffalo for the winter's supply of food and clothing. Although the village had all the appearances of being a permanent abiding place, yet the following morning, before the sun was an hour high, there was not a tent in sight, and the last pack-pony with trailing lodge-poles had passed out of sight over the hills to the eastward.

2.3.1 WAR CHIEF'S TENT. (659)
The war chief is generally a man of more importance in the village, especially when in the neighborhood of enemies, than the chief himself. In this instance his tent, situated in the centre of the encampment, is adorned with broad bands of black, yellow, and white, rendering it quite conspicuous. The war chief, or his lieutenant, issues forth frequently to announce, in the far-reaching voice peculiar to Indians, the orders which are to govern their actions, while within is an almost uninterrupted thumping on drums.

2.3.2 WASHAKIE AND HIS WARRIORS. (661)
A group in front of the tent of the head chief Washakie. About him are gathered all the chief men of the encampment.

2.3.3 WASHAKIE (663)

2.3.4 WASHAKIE (664)
This well-known chief is a man of more than ordinary ability, and his record as a steadfast friend of the white people has come down to the present time without a blemish. He is now well advanced in years but still retains his vigor, and his influence over the tribe. One of the above portraits was made in the South Pass encampment, and the other is a copy of one made in Salt Lake City.

2.3.5 (667)

2.3.6 (669)
GROUPS of in-door and out-door subject, copied from small card views made in Salt Lake City, and which formed a part of the first Blackmore collection.

2.4.1 (1110)

2.4.2 (1111)

2.4.3 (1112)

2.4.4 (1113)

2.4.5 (1114)

2.4.6 (1115)

2.5.1 TENDOI. (Front.) SHOSHONI.

2.5.2 TENDOI. (Profile.) SHOSHONI.

2.5.3 TISIDIMIA. (Front.) SHOSHONI.

2.5.4 TISIDIMIA. (Profile.) SHOSHONI.

2.5.5 URIEWICI. (Front.) SHOSHONI.

2.5.6 URIEWICI. (Profile.) SHOSHONI.

2.6.1 TAIHI. (Front.) SHOSHONI.

2.6.2 TAIHI. (Profile.) SHOSHONI.

2.6.3 "PETE." (Front.) SHOSHONI.

2.6.4 "PETE." (Profile.) SHOSHONI.

5. UTAHS.

2.6.5 (765)

2.6.6 (766)

2.7.2 GUERO. (768)
Present chief of the Tabeguache Utes. Guero belongs to that class of chiefs among the Indians who generally succeed their fathers as leaders of a band which hunts and fights in a separate party. He has about 50 lodges in his band, and therefore has considerable influence. When younger he distinguished hmself in the wars against the Navajos, but in later years has abandoned his warlike proclivities. He is a staunch supporter of Ouray's peace policy with the Government, and generally lives at the agency, assisting the agent in the distribution of the annuity goods and provisions.

2.7.3 SHAVANO. TABEGUACHE. (772)

2.7.4 SHAVANO. TABEGUACHE. (773)

2.7.5 SHAVANO. TABEGUACHE. (781)
War chief of the Tabeguaches, and the most prominent warrior among the Utes. The Arapahoes and Cheyennes fear and hate him; he never goes on the war¬path but brings back a scalp of his enemies. Has distinguished himself often by the fierceness of his attack, generally going into a fight naked, and has been wounded several times in such encounters. In the council he is always for peace with the whites, and has used his influence to make those treaties whereby all difficulties were obviated. He is an eloquent orator, and when speaking is often applauded by his people.

2.7.6 TAPUCHE. CAPOTE. (751)
A young chief of the Capote band of Utes, son of Sobita, their principal chief. The latter is now very old, and does not attend to the duties of his office, his son taking his place. Both are strong supporters of Ouray and his peace-policy. Tapuche was the delegate of his tribe to visit Washington and confirm the treaty of 1873.

2.8.1 MAUTCHICK. MUACHE. (752)
A young chief of the Muache Utes, who has during the last few years gained considerable influence, and is now considered the war chief of his band in place of Curacanto. Was also the delegate to Washington in 1873.

2.8.2 CO-HO. The lame man. MUACHE. (754)

2.8.3 ANTERO. Graceful Walker. (756)

2.8.4 ANTERO. Graceful Walker (757)

2.8.5 WA-NE-RO. Yellow Flower. (759)

2.8.6 WA-NE-RO. Yellow Flower. (760)

2.9.1 TABIYUNA. One Who Wins the Race. (761)

2.9.2 TABIYUNA. One Who Wins the Race. (762)

2.9.3 KO-MUS. (763) 2.9.4 KO-MUS. (764)
An intelligent young Indian of the Uinta band, who was brought east by Major Powell, of the Colorado exploring expedition, who educated him, and then employed him as a clerk in his office in Washington, but died suddenly a short time since.

2.9.5 JOHN. YAMPAH. (769)
A young warrior of the Yampah Utes, well known among the people of Colorado by the soubriquet of "John," and as a particularly good friend of the white settlers. Died suddenly at the Hot Springs in Middle Park in 1873.

2.9.6 KWA-KO-NUT. A King, and MDSE. MUACHE. (770)

2.10.1 CU-RA-CAN-TE. MUACHE. (771)
The old war chief of his band, and in former days quite noted for his independent raids into the country of the Cheyennes and their allies. In the winter of 1868-'69 he organized a body of 100 warriors, and, as leder of these, was attached to the column under Colonel Evans, operating against the Kiowas and Comanches, which campaign ended in the surrender of these Indians. He is now quite old and has lost much of his influence, his son Maut chick succeeding him.

2.10.2 GROUP representing—
¬OURAY.
SHAVANO.
GUERO.
ANKATOSH.
WA-RETS. (775)

2.10.3 GROUP of seven, representing-
¬"JOHN."
MA-KU-TCHA-WO or SA-PE-A.
CU-RA-CAN-TE.
TO-SHI-MY, or Black Bear.
KWA-KO-NUT, or A King.
"MDSE."
MEYICANO. (776)

2.10.4 SURIAP. YAMPAH. (777)
A son of Lodge Pole, a prominent chief and a warrior in his band. Was one of a delegation to visit Washington in 1868 to make the treaty with the Government. He has not, however, come up to the expectations of his people, as, although a young man, he has not ditinguished himself in any way, so that he remains a simple warrior to this day.

2.10.5 LITTLE SOLDIER. (779)

2.10.6 SQUAW OF LITTLE SOLDIER (780)

2.11.1 LOVO. The Wolf. (782)
Lovo was noted among the Utes for his ability in following the trail of man or beast, hunting, or on the war-path, and had gained the name of being the best scout. Was frequently employed as "runner" by the Government in carrying dispatches, and was noted for his promptness in executing these commissions. Is a brother of chief Guero, and died in October, 1874, while hunting on the Republican River.

2.11.2 PE-AH, or Black-Tail Deer. (785)
A young chief of the Grand River of Utes. As a delegate of his tribe, he helped to make the treaty of 1868 in Washington, and signed it; but since then he has never acknowledged it, and, with his band, has kept off the present reservation, camping generally near Denver. He has about 35 lodges, or 250 people, with him. He is a nephew of the late principal chief Nevava, who died in 1868. He is quite a young man, very adroit and amibitious, and possessed of considerable ability. Has distinguished himself as a warrior in contests with the Arapahoes. He has many enemies among the Utes on account of his overbearing disposition and pride of birth and position, but manages to gain in influence, so that the Government has been obliged to establish a special agency for his band at Denver.

2.11.3 SAPPIX and SON. (787)

2.11.4 CHU. (788)

2.11.5 KANOSH. (789)

2.11.6 MISCELLANEOUS GROUP; copy from the original Blackmore collection. (790)

2.12.1 MISCELLANEOUS GROUP; copy from the original Blackmore collection. (791)

2.12.2 MISCELLANEOUS GROUP; copy from the original Blackmore collection. (792)

2.12.3 MISCELLANEOUS GROUP; copy from the original Blackmore collection. (794)

2.12.4 MISCELLANEOUS GROUP; copy from the original Blackmore collection. (955)

2.12.5 MISCELLANEOUS GROUP; copy from the original Blackmore collection. (956)

2.12.6 UTE CAMP AT LOS PINOS.

2.13.1 MISCELLANEOUS GROUP; copy from the original Blackmore collection. (958)

2.13.2 CAMP SCENE among the Utes at Los Pinos. (961)

2.13.3 CAMP SCENE among the Utes at Los Pinos. (962)

2.13.4 CAMP SCENE among the Utes at Los Pinos. (963)

2.13.5 GROUP OF PEAH AND HIS HEAD MEN. (520)

VI. SAHAPTINS

1. NEZ PERCES

2.13.6 KAL-KAL-SHU-A-TASH, or Jason (427)

2.14.1. KAL-KAL-SHU-A-TASH, or Jason. (428)

2.14.2 TA-MA-SON, or Timothy. (429)

2.14.3 TA-MA-SON, or Timothy. (430)

2.14.4 ENCAMPMENT ON THE YELLOWSTONE RIVER. (433)
The temporary camp of a small hunting party, who were visiting their friends the Crows at the old agency, near the mouth of Shields River. This and the following views were made in 1871.

2.14.5 LODGES IN THE VILLAGE. (435)

2.14.6 LODGES IN THE VILLAGE. (436)

2.15.1 THE CHIEF OF THE VILLAGE. (437)

2. WARM SPRINGS

2.15.2 CAPPOLAS. A Boney Man. (1058)
Took a prominent part in the Modoc war, and distinguished himself by the capture of Captain Jack in the lava-beds. Height, 5.5 1/2; circumference of head, 22 3/4.

2.15.3 SHAKA. Little Beaver. (1061)
A sergeant in the company that captured Captain Jack. Height, 5.8; circumference of head, 22 5/8.

2.15.4 HISTO. Clam Fish. (1063)
Height, 5.7 3/4; circumference of head, 22 7/8.

2.15.5 WEY-A-TAT-HAN. Owl. (1059)
The married man of the party, his wife accompanying him on his travels. Was wounded in the lava-beds, and with five others were the scouts who first discovered Captain Jack's hiding place in the cave.

2.15.6 CHIN-CHIN-WET. Alone. (1064)
Wife of Weyatathan. A very comely and intelligent Indian woman, of whom but very few are found among the far western tribes. Height, 4.11 1/2; circumference of head, 21 1/2.

2.16.1 SEMEO, or Umatilla Jim. (1057)

3. WASCOS.

2.16.2 KLE-MAT-CHOSNY. Agate Arrow-Point. (1062)
Is a chief and a member of the Presbyterian Churhc, and a zealous worker for the spiritual welfare of his pople. Height, 5.6 3/4; circumference of head, 21 3/4.

2.16.3 STAT-TLA-KA. Pole Cat. (1060)
Height, 5.4; circumference of head, 20 5/8.

2.16.4 OSCAR MARK, or Little Vessel. (1055)
Height, 5.5; circumference of head, 23 1/4.

VII. KALMATHS

1. KLAMATHS (no photographs)

2. MODOCS

2.16.5 SCAR-FACED CHARLEY. (1008)
The famous war chief of the lava-bed warriors, and the greatest of their soldiers. He was the most trusted of Captain Jack's braves, and the most desperate of his fighters. Rev. Dr. Thomas, who was slain at the peace-commission massacre, on the day before his death called Scar-Faced Charley the "Leonidas of the lava-beds." He was never known to be guilty of any act not authorized by the laws of legitimate warfare, and entered his earnest protest against the assassination of General Canby and Dr. Thomas. He led the Modocs against Major Thomas and Colonel Wright when two-thirds of our men were killed and wounded. Wearied of the slaughter, he shouted to the survivors, "You fellows that are not dead had better go home; we don't want to kill you all in one day." He has said since, "My heart was sick of seeing so many men killed."

2.16.6 SHACK-NASTY JIM. (1009)
The sub-chief of the tribe and chief of the Hot Creek band of the Modocs; although hardly twenty-one years of age, is known throughout Christendom as one of the most fearless warriors that the red men ever sent to fight the pale-faces. He led the tribal forces that suffered most severely. After the massacre he quarelled with Captain Jack; and, with "Bogus Charley," "Hooker Jim," and "Steamboat Frank," became scout for General Jeff. C. Davis--which led to capture of the remnants of the Modoc army.

2.17.1 STEAMBOAT FRANK. (1010)
One of the participators in the Modoc war, but after the massacre of General Canby's party, left his tribe, and as a scout under General Davis, did good service in securing the capture of the remnants of Captain Jack's forces.

2.17.2 WI-NE-MA, or Tobey Riddle. (1011)
The modern Pocahontas, who, at the risk of her own life, saved the life of Col. A. B. Meacham, chariman of the Modoc peace commission, at the Modoc massacre. The Oregon Statesman truly says: "A truer heroine was never born in the American forest than the poor Indian woman, Tobey Riddle, whose exertions to save one who had befriended herself and people were no less daring and resolute than the devotion of Pocahontas. We have nowhere read of a woman, white, black, or red, performing an act of sublimer herosim than Tobey Riddle, when, under suspicions of treachery, she returned to her people in the rocks, with an almost absolute certainty of being flayed alive. The description of that event is one of the finest passages in Mr. Meacham's speech, and is a fitting tribute to the courage and fidelity of his dusky, lion-hearted friend. The gratitude, fidelity, and devotion of that poor squaw ought to forever put to silence and shame those heartless savages who, in the midst of Christian civilization, are clamoring for the extinction of a people whom God had planted where they were found." Tobey is 28 years of age, and the wife of Frank Riddle. She is honored by all who know her.

3. ROGUE RIVERS

2.17.3 OL-HA-THE. (978) (TEXT)

VIII. PIMAS.

1. PAPAGOS

2.17.4 ASCENCION RIOS. (Front.) (650)

2.17.5 ASCENCION RIOS. (Profile.) (651)

2. PIMAS

2.17.6 LUIG MORAGUE. (Front.) (653)

2.18.1 LUIG MORAGUE. (Profile.) (654)

IX. IROQUOIS.

1. SENECAS

2.18.2 HOH-HO-I-YO. Samuel Jimson. (1046)
Samuel Jimson, as he is ordinarily known, is one of a family of thirty-one children, and was born on the Alleghany reservation in 1837. Is a descendant of Mary Jimson, a white captive among the Senecas, whose descendants now number 111. Is a farmer, but also a fine orator, and of more than ordinary ability. Has been a councillor for eleven terms in succession. Height, 6.1; head, 23; chest, 43.

2.18.3 DYAR-YO-NAA-DAR-GA-DAH. One who Carries Hemlock Boughs on his Back. (1048)
English name, Caster Redeye. Was born on the Alleghany reservation; belongs to the traditionary Bear clan. Is now President of the New York Senecas. Does not speak English, but is an eloquent speaker in his native tongue. Has been a councillor three terms. Is a farmer and lumberman, and has also been a pilot for several years on the Alleghany River. Caster is a grandson of Governor Blacksnake, the famous chief of the Senecas, who died in 1859 at the age of 120 years. Age, 46; height, 5.9; head, 22 1/2; chest, 43.

2.18.4 DAR-GAR-SWEN-GAR-ANT. Dropping the Stock of the Gun. (1045)
Commonly known as Harrison Halftown; belongs to the Snipe clan. Was born on the Alleghany reservation. Is the clerk of the nation, which position he has held for the last eight years. Was well educated at a Quaker school adjoining the reservation, and speaks English fluently. Is a fine speaker, and is quite noted as an orator. Age, 47; height, 5.8; head, 23 1/4; chest 42.

2.18.5 GROUPS COMPRISING 1045-46-47. (980)

2.18.6 A DAUGHTER OF GENERAL PARKER. (715)
Copy from an old daguerreotype.

2. WYANDOTS.

2.19.1 MATHEW MUDEATER. (981)
Head chief of the Wyandots, and a delegate in 1875 to Washington, with power to settle all complications between his tribe and the Government growing out of sundry treaties. Was born in 1813, in Canada.

2.19.2 HENTO. (Front.) WAYANDOTTE.

2.19.3 HENTO. (Profile.) WAYANDOTTE.

X. MUSKOGEES.

1. CREEKS

2 19.4 LO-CHA-HA-JO. The Drunken Terrapin. (97)
Served as a first lieutenant in the Union Army during the rebellion, and was at that time and is now the leading spirit of the loyal Creeks. Is the treaty¬making chief. Age, about 35.

2.19.5 TAL-WA-MI-KO. Town King. (98)
Commonly known as John McGilvry. is a brother-in-law of Oporthleyoholo, a famous chief of the last generation, and stood by him during their struggles with and flight from the rebel Creeks. is at the present time the second leading spirit of the the loyal Creeks. Age, about 30.

2.19.6 TAM-SI-PEL-MAN. Thompson Perryman.
First organizer of the loyal Creeks that came north during the rebellion. Was a councilor of Oporthleyoholo, and a steadfast adherent to the treaties made with the Government. Age, about 40.

2.20.1 HO-TUL-KO-MI-KO. Chief of the Whirlwind. (100)
English name, Silas Jefferson; is of mixed African and Creek parentage; born in Alabama and raised among the Creeks in that State, removing with them to their present home in the Indian Territory. is to all intents and purposes one of the tribe, taking a wife from among them, and sharing all their troubles. Was interpreter for the loyal Creeks during the war, and is now the official interpreter of the nation. Age, 45.

2.20.2 KOT-CO-CU, or Tiger. (103)
Served in the Union Army as a lieutenant. Was one of the council in framing the treaty of 1866. in 1871 was a candidate for chief, but was defeated, and died shortly after.

2.20.3 OK-TA-HA-SAS-HAJO, or Sand. (104)
The predecessor of Lo-cha-ha jo as the treaty-making chief of the nation, and second chief under Oporthleyoholo. Was among the first to join the Union forces during the rebellion. Was chief of the council that framed the new constitution in 1866. Has not been educated, but has great natural ability, and is of an extremely sensitive and kindly disposition.

2.20.4 FAMILY OF GEORGE STEADMAN. (Half-bloods.) (105)

2.20.5 FAMILY OF GEORGE STEADMAN. (Half-bloods.) 106)

2.20.6 FAMILY OF GEORGE STEADMAN. (Half-bloods.) (107)

2.21.1 A CREEK BRAVE. (108)

2.21.2 (1119)

2.21.3 (1120)

2. SEMINOLES

2.21.4 O-LAC-TO-MI-CO. Billy Bowlegs.
The well-known and famous leader of the Seminoles in the Florida war, 1835-'42, but was finally compelled to remove with the remnants of his tribe to the Indian Territory.

2.21.5 (1122)

3. CHICKASAWS

2 .21.6 J. D. James (73)

2.22.1 ASH-KE-HE-NA-NIEW. (74)

2.22.2 SHO-NI-ON. (75)

2.22.3 A YOUNG BRAVE. (77)

4. CHOCTAWS

2.22.4 ISRAEL FOLSOM. (88)

2.22.5 PETER FOLSOM. (89)

2.22.6 SAMUEL FOLSOM. (90)

2.23.1 FOLSOM. (91)

2.23.2 FAUNCEWAY BAPTISTE. (92)

2.23.3 SAMUEL GARLAND. (94)

2.23.4 ALLEN WRIGHT. (96)

2.23.5 SQUAWS. (936)

2.23.6 SQUAWS. (937)

2.24.1 YOUNG BOYS. (938)

2.24.2 YOUNG BOYS. (939)

XI. INDEPENDENT AND UNCLASSIFIED TRIBES.

1. ARAPAHOS

2.24.3 CRAZY BULL. NORTHERN ARAPAHOS.
FRIDAY. NORTHERN ARAPAHOS. (24)

2.24.5 POWDER FACE AND SQUAW. NORTHERN ARAPAHOS. (22)

2.24.6 ??

2.25.1 ??

2.25.2 PLENTY BEARS. NORTHERN ARAPAHOS.
OLD EAGLE. NORTHERN ARAPAHOS. (25)

2.25.3 BI-NAN-SET. Big Mouth. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (32)

2.25.4 BI-NAN-SET. Big Mouth. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (34)

2.25.5 BI-NAN-SET. Big Mouth. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (35)

2.25.6 WHITE CROW. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (36)

2.26.1 WHITE CROW. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (37)

2.26.2 BLACK CROW. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (38)

2.26.3 BLACK CROW. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (39)

2.26.4 LEFT HAND. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (40)

2.26.5 LEFT HAND. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (41)

2.26 6 YELLOW HORSE. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (42)

2.27.1 YELLOW HORSE. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (43)

2.27.2 HEAP O' BEARS. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (44)

2.27.3 HEAP O' BEARS. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (45)

2.27.4 OHASTE. Little Raven. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (63)

2.27.5 OHASTE. Little Raven. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (64)

2.27.6 OHASTE. Little Raven. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (62)
In 1865, Richardson described him as follows: "The savage, like Falstaff, is a coward on instinct; also treacherous, filthy, and cruel. But our chief, The Little Raven, was the nearest approximation I ever met to the ideal Indian. He had a fine manly form, and a human, trustworthy face."

2.28.1 OHASTE. Little Raven. SOUTHERN ARAPAHOS. (65) (see above)

2.28.2 BIRD CHIEF. (Bust, Front.) (909)

2.28.3 BIRD CHIEF. (Bust, Profile.) (911)

2.28.4 BIRD CHIEF. (Standing, Front.) (910)

2.28.5 BIRD CHIEF. (Standing, Profile.) (912)

2.28.6 FRIDAY. (984)
The well-known chief of the Northern Arapahos and one who has had a prominent position for the last twenty-five years. Speaks English fluently and always acts as his own interpreter.

2.29.1 A YOUNG MAN. (755)
Living with and brought up with the Southern Arapahos, but claimed by Ouray, chief of the Utes, to be his son, captured in battle several years since. Ouray has made an appeal to the Government for his restitution, but the young man prefers his present home.

2.29.2 NAUATC. (Profile.) ARAPAHO.

2.29.3 NAUATC. (Front.) ARAPAHO.

2.29.4 OCHOHISA. (Profile.) ARAPAHO.

2.29.5 OCHOHISA. (Front.) ARAPAHO.

2. CADDOS

2.29.6 SHO-E-TAT Little Boy (159)

2.30.1 SHO-E-TAT. Little Boy. (160)
English name, Geo. Washington. Born in Louisiana in 1816. Is probably the most progressive Indian on the reservation; has long since adopted the dress and customs of the whites; owns a trading-store, and has a well-cultivated farm of 113 acres, with good houses and improvements. Was captain during the rebellion of a company of Indian scouts and rangers in the service of the Confederate States army, and engaged in three battles, one on the Cache Creek, Indian Territory, with Kiowas and Apaches; one with Cheyennes, in the Wichita Mountains; and one on the Little Washita, with renegade Caddos.

2.30.2 NAH-AH-SA-NAH. Indian. ANADARKO. (161)

2.30.3 NAH-AH-SA-NAH. Indian. ANADARKO. (162)
Commonly known as Warloupe; probably a corruption of Guadeloupe. Was born near Nacitoches about 1825. Is now chief of the Caddos, and considered in advance of most of his people. Is doing his utmost to elevate his tribe to the standard of the white man. Height, 5.6 1/2; chest, inspiration, 37; expiration, 34 1/2; circumference of head over ears, 21 1/2; diameter of head from ear to ear, 14 1/2.

2.30.4 ANTELOPE. (163)

2.30.5 ANTELOPE. (164)
With the preceding was a delegate to Washington in 1872, but died shortly after his return.

3. CHEROKEES

2.30.6 COLONEL DOWNING. (66)

2.31.1 RICHARDS. (67)

2.31.2 COLONEL ADAIR. (68)

2.31.3 SAMUEL SMITH. (69)

2.31.4 BORUM DAVIS. (70)

2.31.5 CAPTAIN SCRAPER. (71)

2.31.6 BINGO. (72)

4. MOQUIS

2.32.1 (1098)

2.32.2 NUM-PAYU. Harmless Snake. (983)
A comely young maiden of the pueblo of Tewa. The peculiar style in which the hair is worn, as shown in this picture, is a sign of maidenhood. After marriage the hair is allowed to hang down the back, or is gathered in a small knot at the back of the head. The Moquis dress themselves entirely in woolen goods of their own manufacture, in which they are quite expert, their women's dress and blankets forming their principal stock in trade.

2.32.3 DELEGATION TO BRIGHAM YOUNG. (416)
Copy of a photograph of three Moqui Indians from the Pueblo of Oraybi, delegated to visit the Mormon president for the purpose of encouraging trade.

2.32.4 NA-NA-AN-YE. A al metor de la Sierra. (1015)
Spanish name, Antonio Jose Atencio. Head chief of all the Pueblos. Can read and write Spanish. Age, 70; height, 5.4 1/2.

5. PUEBLOS

2.32.5 TSE-WA-AN-YE. Tail of the Eagle Fluttering. (1016)
Spanish name, Antonio al Churleta. Governor of the pueblo of San Juan, and is the bearer of a cane, the badge of his office, which is marked "A. Lincoln, a San Juan, 1863." Can read and write in the Spanish language. Age, 64; height, 5.6 1/2.

2.32.6 WA-SO-TO-YA-MIN. Small Feathers of the Eagle. (1017)
Spanish name, Juan Jesus Leo. Governor of the pueblo of Taos; which position is retained but for one year. Is the bearer of a cane marked "A. Lincol a Taos." Age, 45; height, 5.7 1/2.

2.33.1 AMBROSIA ABEITA. (643)

2.33.2 ALEJANDRO PADILLO. (644)

2.33.3 GROUPS WITH ABEITA AND PADILLO. (645)

2.33.4 GROUPS WITH ABEITA AND PADILLO. (646)

2.33.5 GROUP OF ANTONIO JOSE ATENCIO, ANTONIO AL CHURLETA< and JUAN JESUS LEO. (992)

2.33.6 THE HERDER. (16)

2.34.1 THE HERDER. (17)
One of the former governors of the pueblo of Taos.

2.34.2. GROUP OF CORRIDORES. (20)
Young men who are selected to runfoot-races during the "feasts" or religious holidays.

2.34.3 YOUNG MAIDEN. ("PUEBLO GIRL OF TAOS.") (618)
A very good-looking young woman of the pueblo of Taos, with her hair gathered over the ears, signifying her single state. This custom also obtains among the Moquis.

2.34.4 YOUNG GIRLS AND WOMEN OF THE PUEBLO OF TAOS. (614)

2.34.5 YOUNG GIRLS OF THE PUEBLO OF TAOS. (617)

2.34.6 YOUNG GIRLS AND WOMEN OF THE PUEBLO OF TAOS. (626)

2.35.1 VARIOUS INDIVIDUALS belonging to the pueblo of Taos. (613)

2.35.2 VARIOUS INDIVIDUALS belonging to the pueblo of Taos. (625)

2.35.3 VARIOUS INDIVIDUALS belonging to the pueblo of Taos. (622)

6. TAWACANIES

2.35.4 DAVE. (738)

2.35.5 CAW-LAC-ITS-CA. Son of Dave. (740)

2.35.6 CAW-LAC-ITS-CA. Son of Dave. (741)

7. TEMICULSA

2.36.1 KA-LEK. Hanging. (993)
Chief of the Temiculas, and delegate recently to Washington, to seek from the General Government the restitution of some of their land, from which this tribe had been ejected by the State government. Is a man of marked intelligence, and speaks Spanish fluently. Age, 45; height, 5.10; head, 23 1/2; chest, 47 1/2; weight, 245.

2.36.2 ANDREW MAGRAND. (994)
Temicula and Mexican half-breed. Age, 27.

2.36.3 JOHN CLIFT. (995)
Temicula and Mexican half-breed. Age, 25.

*****************************************************************

The following photographs are not listed in William Jackson's 1877 Catalogue. They were included as part of the scrapbooks donated to the University of Iowa. Their origin is unknown.

2.37.1 LITTLE BEAR. CHEYENNE.

2.37.2 , PAWNEE.

2.37.3 YELLOW BEAR, ARAPAHO.

2.37.4 PLENTY HORSES, CHEYENNE.

2.38.1 FEATHER WOLF, CHEYENNE.

2.38.2 STARVING ELK, CHEYENNE.

2.38.3 LITTLE CHIEF, CHEYENNE.

2.38.4 BIG SPOTTED HORSE, PAWNEE.

2.39.1 GOVERNOR OF SAN FILIPI SHOWING MANNER OF USING DRILL.

2.39.2 WAHU TOYA, AN AGED PECOS.

2.39.3 WIFE OF THE GOVERNOR OF SAN JUAN PUEBLO.

2.39.4 GOVERNOR OF SAN JUAN PUEBLO.

2.40.1 POTSHUNO, OF NAMBE.

2.40.2 GOVERNOR OF SANTA CLARA.

2.40.3

2.40.4 FAUSTINA AND OTUBIANA, PUEBLO DE NAMBE.

2.41.1 WAR CAPTAIN AND CHIEF HUNTER OF THE PUEBLO OF NAMBE.

2.41.2 ANTONIO JOSE VIJIL, GOVERNOR OF NAMBE.

2.41.3 DOMINGO SUASA, GOVERNOR OF TESUQUE.

2.41.4 PABLA TAFOLLA AS A WATER CARRIER.

2.42.1 FRANCISCO ARESO, CACIQUE OF COCHITI.

2.42.2 DIONISIA VIJIL AND KATINITA SUASA, DE TESUQUE.

2.42.3 ALBINO BOY OF JEMEZ.

2.42.4 TESUQUE OX CART.

2.43.1 WOMAN POLISHING POTTERY.

2.43.2 JOSE VICTORIANO MARTIN, GOVERNOR OF JEMEZ AND HIS WIFE, MARIA REY

2.43.3 CLIFF HOUSE, NM

2.43.4 MOQUI MAIDENS

2.43.5 ANCIENT RUINS IN THE CANON OF THE MANCOS

2.43.6 CLIFF RUINS. MANCOS CANON.

2.44.1 ANICENT RUINS IN THE CANON OF THE MANCOS. (200)

2.44.2 CLIFF RUINS, MANCOS CANON. (201)

2.44.3 ANCIENT RUINS IN THE CANON OF THE MANCOS. (202)

2.44.4 ANCIENT RUINS IN THE CANON OF THE MANCOS. (203)

2.44.5 MANCOS CANON. (204)

2.44.6 RUINS AT AZTEC SPRINGS. (205)

2.44.7 ANCIENT RUINED CITY AT AZTEC SPRINGS. (206)

2.44.8 ANCIENT RUINS AT THE HEAD OF THE MCELMO. (207)

2.45.1 FORTIFIED ROCK ON THE MCELMO. (208)

2.45.2 CAVE DWELLINGS NEAR THE FORTIFIED ROCK ON THE MCELMO. (210)

2.45.3 OLD TOWER NEAR THE MCELMO. (212)

2.45.4 RUINED FORTRESS ON THE HOVVENWEEP. (213)

2.45.6 CLIFF HOUSE, RIO SAN JUAN. (215)

2.45.7 CASA DEL ECO, RIO SAN JUAN. (216)

2.45.8 CAVE TOWN ON THE RIO DE CHELLE. (217)

2.46.1 CAVETOWN ON THE RIO DE CHELLE, ARIZONA. (218)

2.46.2 CAVETOWN ON THE RIO DE CHELLEY. (219)

2.46.3 CAVETOWN ON THE RIO DE CHELLEY. (220)

2.46.4 RUINS IN MONTEZUMA CANON. (221)

2.46.5 RUINS IN MONTEZUMA CANON. (222)

2.46.6 TOWER IN CANON NEAR SIERRA ABAJO, UTAH. (290)

2.46.7 CAVE RUINS IN CANON NEAR SIERRA ABAJO. (223)

2.46.8 CLIFF HOUSE IN CANON NEAR THE SIERRA ABAJO, UTAH. (224)

2.47.1 CLIFF RUINS, SIERRA ABAJO. (293?)

2.47.2 VIEW FROM TEQUA TOWARD MOQUI. (225)

2.47.3 HOUSE OF THE CAPTAIN OF TEQUA. (297)

2.47.4 GUALPI. (227)

2.47.5 SHE PAUL-A WEE. (228)

2.47.6 MOO-SHA-NEH FROM SHE-PAUL-A-VE. (229)

2.47.7 SHEMOPAVE. (230)

2.47.8 HOUSE OF THE CAPTAAN OF SHEMOPAVE. (231)

2.48 15 photographs of unidentified tribe

2.49 15 photographs of unidentified tribe

2.50 15 photographs of unidentified tribe

2.51 15 photographs of unidentified tribe

2.52 15 photographs of unidentified tribe

2.53 15 photographs of unidentified tribe

2.54 15 photographs of unidentified tribe

2.55 15 photographs of unidentified tribe and village

2.56.1 GENERAL VIEW OF ZUNI.

2.56.2 MODERN PUEBLO, ZUNI.

2.57.1 VIEW IN ZUNI, LOOKING N.E.

2.57.2 VIEW IN ZUNI.

2.58.1 TERRACED HOUSES, ZUNI.

2.58.2 THE GOVERNOR'S HOUSE, ZUNI.

2.59.1 ZUNI, THE DANCE.

2.59.2 ZUNI, SOUTH FRONT EAGLE COURT.

2.60.1 ZUNI, LOOKING S.E.

2.60.2 ZUNI, FROM TOP LOOKING EAST.

2.61.1 ZUNI, EAGLE COURT.

2.61.2 VIEW IN ZUNI, LOOKING S.E.

2.62.1 FIRST TERRACE OF ZUNI.

2.62.2 VIEW IN ZUNI, LOOKING S.E.

2.63.1 MIDDLE COURST OF ZUNI.

2.63.2 ZUNI FROM TOP LOOKING WEST.

2.64.1 "THE MESA," THE SITE OF ZUNI.

2.64.2 FROM THE TOP OF ZUNI, LOOKING EAST.

2.65.1 VIEW IN ZUNI.

2.65.2 VIEW OF ZUNI LOOKING S.W.

2.66.1 VIEW IN ZUNI LOOKING SOUTH.

2.66.2 VIEW IN ZUNI LOOKING S.

2.67.1 WEST FRONT OF ZUNI.

2.67.2 ZUNI, SOUTH FRONT LOOKING WEST.

2.68.1 SOUTHERN FRONT OF ZUNI.
2.68.2 CENTRE OF ZUNI.

2.69.1 -----¬

2.69.2 -----¬

2.70.1 GOVERNORS OF ZUNI.

2.70.2 ZUNI SCHOOL CHILDREN.

2.71.1 THE CACIQUES OF ZUNI.

2.71.2 GROUP OF ZUNI ALBINOS.

2.72.1 ZUNI SCHOOL BOYS.

2.72.2 ZUNI WATER CARRIER.

2.73.1 "WOLPI," ONE OF THE MOQUI TOWNS.

2.74.1 PUEBLO DE TAOS (NORTH)

2.74.2 PUEBLO DE TAOS (SOUTH TOWN)

2.75.1

2.75.2 PUEBLO DE JEMEZ.

2.76.2 PUEBLO DE SANTA CLARA.

2.77.1

2.77.2 PUEBLO DE SAN FILIPE.

2.78.1 PUEBLO DE SANDIA.

2.78.2 PLAZA DE SANDIA.

2.79.1 PUEBLO OF SAN JUAN.

2.79.2 PUEBLO OF SAN JUAN (SOUTH SIDE).

2.80.1 PUEBLO DE SAN ILDEFONSO.

2.80.2 PUEBLO DE TESUQUE.

2.81.1 PUEBLO DE NAMBE.

2.81.2 PUEBLO DE CUCHITE.

2.82.1 PUEBLO DE SIA.

2.82.2 SANTANNA.

2.83.1 PUEBLO DE SANTO DOMINGO.

2.83.2 PUEBLO DE ISLETA.

2.84.1 THE JEMEZ RUINS.

2.84.2 RUINS OF THE OLD CHURCH AT JEMEZ.

2.85.1 RUINS OF CLIFF DWELLINGS IN DE CHELLY CANON.

2.85.2 RUINS OF CLIFF DWELLINGS IN DE CHELLY CANON.

2.86.1 ARAPAHO AND CHEYENNE DELEGATION.

2.87.1 OJIBWA DELEGATION.

2.88.1 DELEGATION OF WICHITA, APACHE, KAIOWA AND COMANCHE INDIANS.

2.89.1 CROW DELEGATION.

2.90.1 SPOTTED TAIL'S DELEGATION,--DAKOTAS.

2.91.1 "SPOTTED TAIL," DAKOTA.

2.92.1 "WHITE THUNDER," DAKOTA.

2.93.1 RED CLOUD DELEGATION--DAKOTAS.

2.94.1 "RED CLOUD,"--DAKOTAS.

2.95.1 "RED SHIRT," OGALALA DAKOTA.

2.96.1 SISSETON DAKOTA DELEGATION.

2.97.1 DAKOTA DELEGATION.

2.98.1 DELEGATION OF DAKOTA, HIDATSA AND ARIKARA INDIANS.

2.99.1 OTOE DELEGATION, JAN. 1881.

2.100.1 SHOSHONI DELEGATION.

2.101.1 "BILLY," A UTE WARRIOR--OURAYS BAND.

2.102.1 "SAM," UTE WARRIOR.

2.103.1 "CHIEF JOSEPH," NEZ PERCES.

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